1) A small town in Michigan that is about an hour's drive away from the MSU area. This town has two buildings. (As I said, SMALL.) The first is an "Ice Scream" store, which also sells t-shirts with slogans such as "Been through Hell" and various other souveniers. The other is a small post office, which will singe the edges of letters and postmark them from Hell. Popular place to send allomony checks from. Will also sell you a square inch of Hell for $6.66.

Due to Hell's location, it really does freeze over quite often.

2) A fictional place of torture during the afterlife. A place Unitarians don't believe in.

3) Any place you don't want to be.
1) So, I was walking through Hell yesterday and it was freezing, man. There was almost four inches of snow on the ground.

2)Oh noes! You stole that pen you found in the street?! You're going to Hell!

3) Oh, God. My mom's making us go to Hell. Something about a speech she's giving. All I know is we're spending 4 hours in some hot, sweaty auditorium.
#hell #heaven #msu #christianity #unitarianism
by Maggalaggadingdong August 27, 2006
1.The opposite of heaven
2.A nice little town in Michigan
1."If you continue to say things like that,you're gonna burn in hell for eternity."
2."Want to go to Hell for spring break?"
#antonyms:heaven #a nice place #somehwere not in michigan #a godly place #a cold place
by crazyrawkergirl June 08, 2006
Hell is a word that originated from a Viking religion. The Teutonic Goddess of the Dead and the underworld was named Hel, she was the daughter of Loki. Another “L” was added to her name, and for reasons unknown “Hell” came to be a word that would substitute several different ideas and places in the bible.

Hell should not be in the bible at all. Hell means whatever word the translator put Hell in place of in the manuscript they were rendering. Originally it substituted Hades and Sheol, which is fine because they both mean the same thing, (the grave) only in two different languages. But Hell came to take on meanings derived from Greek mythology and other pagan ideas. Hell began to substitute other places that were completely different than Sheol and Hades, like Gehenna and Tartarus. But the definition of the word hell in most cultures is “to cover” or “to conceal.” (Which goes along with Sheol and Hades.)

Hell and Hellfire are deceptive words. When hell is used to indicate fire in the bible it is referring to Gehenna, a place of destruction, not a common grave of mankind, which Hades and Sheol both mean.

The Old English dialect spoke of “helling” potatoes. This did not mean to roast them in fire, but meant to put them in the ground.

Hell cannot be Gehenna, “the unquenchable fire” if it is also Hades, because “the Lake of Fire” is the same place that Jesus described as Gehenna, and Hades is going to be thrown into “the lake of fire” upon the second death. So most bibles indicate that “the Lake of Fire” is going to be thrown into “the Lake of Fire!” Revelation 20:14 Destruction into destruction? That doesn’t make any sense. The point of that scripture is that death and all that is bad, even the place of the dead, are going to be destroyed. So you can see the common inaccuracy and inconsistencies of the usage of Hell in the bible.

How can you rightly substitute four different words that have different meanings with one word, unless you intend on misleading people to believe that these four different places are the same place?
And if thy hand offend thee, cut it off: it is better for thee to enter into life maimed, than having two hands to go into hell, into the fire that never shall be quenched: (note: for “hell” - original literature read “Gehenna”)

And death and hell were cast into the lake of fire. This is the second death. (note: for "hell" original literature read "Hades")

For if God spared not the angels that sinned, but cast them down to hell, and delivered them into chains of darkness, to be reserved unto judgment;
(note: for "hell" original literature read “Tartarus”)

I made the nations to shake at the sound of his fall, when I cast him down to hell with them that descend into the pit: (note: for "hell" – original literature read "Sheol")
#hell #tartarus #gehenna #hades #the lake of fire #sheol
by coupedehill September 23, 2009
The Department of Motor Vehicles. A place where you stand in line for 4-5 hours, in mid-summer, in a building with no air conditioning, only to be told by one of Satan's imps that you lack 1 one of the 5 forms of identification needed to exchange your Minnesota drivers licence for a Utah one.

Contrary to popular belief, DMV employees are not human.They are vampires who feed on pure human misery,circular logic, and pointless bureaucracy.
During a visit to the nineth circle of Hell, also known as the DMV, I was unsuprised to see the grown man in front of me collapse and burst into tears. I was even less suprised when the employees the began to laugh like jackals.
#evil #satan #hellhole #misery #torture
by Mr. Random Person May 23, 2010
A number of distinct words and concepts in the original Greek that the New Testament was written in were all translated into the single English word Hell, from the Teutonic word ‘Hel’ which meant ‘to cover’ and later was the name of the Norse goddess of the underworld and later of the underworld itself.
Tartaros
In 2 Pet. 2:4 this word is used to describe a place where angels, not human beings, that have sinned are temporarily imprisoned.
Geenna
This word is used by Jesus to reference a physical (not ethereal) and specific (not abstract) garbage dump in the southwest of Jerusalem where the physical bodies (not ethereal spirits) of criminals were disposed of and cremated in flames instead of being given an honorable burial. When Jesus says hell in contexts such as "Ye serpents, ye generation of vipers, how can ye escape the damnation of hell?” (Matthew 23:33) Geenna is the word actually used. Today this valley is no longer a garbage dump and has instead been converted into a park.
Hades
This word, which means “unseen” describes the state of nonexistence in death. A being in the state of Hades does not do or experience anything. Sometimes poetic license is taken to express some point, but this is figurative. The term itself in the context of the bible refers to the state of nothingness, the Greek counterpart to the Hebrew Sheol.
Sheol
Although this later evolved into a type of afterlife, originally this, like Hades, meant merely the grave. The good and bad alike go here.
Lake of Fire
This was a later construction found in Revelations.
The Christian concept of hell evolved out of a hatred for the Romans, who ruled over the Jews, and a desire to annihilate them totally. This incredibly black hatred and desire for revenge to an unjust degree was forged out of a deep-seated insecurity, the childish rage that can only think of destroying one’s adversaries, and an incredible jealousy that wanted to rule over the Romans the way the Romans currently ruled over the Jews—taken to infinity.
"You're all going to hell!"
"Which one?"
#khrit #christian #tartaros #geenna #hades #sheol #lake of fire
by Freiheit November 26, 2005
Where Adolf Hitler currently is
Hitler is in hell
#hitler #hell #bad #evil #nazi germany
by Connor johansen November 30, 2012
1. a word of truth.
2. used for total agreement with a statement.
3. used to express a strong feeling towards a subject.
John, did you fuck that girl last night?
Hells!

for real u cant respect hoes hells no.
hells right.

was that as good for you as it was for me?
Hells!
by fuck master January 13, 2004
Pronoun: A place that child molesters told their victims they'd go if they told anyone.
"Don't tell anyone what I did to you or you'll be going to Hell!"
#paedophiles #child rape #christianity #hell #child monsters #attack #child abuse
by StevieH884422 May 16, 2010
Free Daily Email

Type your email address below to get our free Urban Word of the Day every morning!

Emails are sent from daily@urbandictionary.com. We'll never spam you.

×