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2.
Goth Punk (or Gothic Punk) is the definition of the roots of dark punk, which is what Goth is. They were originally called DEATHROCKERS, or DEATH PUNKS. In the beginning heydays of punk rock(late 1970's/early 1980's) there were bands like TSOL from Orange County, Siouxsie & The Banshees from the UK, and Chritian Death from L.A. They created a dark form of punk that had defied the borders of the Anarcho/Peace Punks (from the UK), and American Hardcore punks (espeically the Anit-Fashion types) tastes.

Musically, the term goth punk today helps define the sound of bands that have an old school hardcore punk (aka street punk or Thrash) sound with dark lyrics and optionally added keyboard/symphonic samples and electronics. Since goth has strayed away from its punk roots with the rise of Nu-Metal, EBM, and Emo-Pop, the rebellious reaction is more extremely "punk" style goth bands arising in the underground.
Goth Punk Bands:
-AFI
-Alkaline Trio
-Bpeople
-Christian Death
-Flesh Eaters
-Kommunity FK
-Love Equals Death
-TSOL
by Christopher Robert Cole March 17, 2006
 
1.
Sorry Phalkon. It's not really new. Goth Punk came about a little bit before Good Charlotte and co. Well, actually, waaaay before. Try the '70s.
Anyway, punks who dress like goths isn't really new. I'm thinking of Siouxsie Sioux and Dave Vanian, in particular... Then, there were the deathrockers--Christian Death, Shadow Project, etc. Sometimes the Misfits are included, sometimes not.
By the way, it may be worth mentioning that Trent Reznor and Marilyn Manson claim Rozz Williams was an influence on their work.
Zombies, sex, death, and burning crosses... What's not to love?
by nanashi December 01, 2004
 
3.
oh nanashi, you forgot to include the Cure in your bands of early goth punk.

it seems your definition and mine share a few good points, but i'm defining "new" Goth Punk. not the "true" Goth Punk of the 70s and 80s.
the Cure and Siouxsie and the Banshees *ARE* in fact the true definition of Goth Punk, anything today is just crap
by Phalkon December 12, 2004
 
4.
Another term for deathrocker, someone that enjoys deathrock (which has absolutely NOTHING to do with metal).
Usually, the goth punk can be identified by a very zombiefied appearance; mixing punk and goth with a heavy DiY (do-it-yourself) ethic. Their attire usually consists of layers of torn black, white, and green fishnets, heavy combat boots, ripped t-shirts, leather pants or bleached jeans, and a leather jacket/vest full of band patches, studs, designs, plastic bones, etc. Many of them have huge, teased hair, and a very popular style for both men and women is the death-hawk, a wider, teased version of the mohawk.

Goth punks (or deathrockers) can be thought of as the missing link between goth and punk. They're not any more rambunctious or outspoken than regular goths or punks; they just have different tastes.
Hey, look at that goth punk! He looks just like Johnny Slut!
by Evil Ed 667 March 03, 2007
 
5.
A goth that is also punk. Someone in between labels. People who rag on musicians, like the two peoplw that have posted so far have no right to do so because they arent the ones making millions of dollars. for people like this, see idiot
people that judge everyone that is better at something than they are, should quit whining and find something better to do than rag on musicians over the internet.
by _Cory_ June 06, 2005
 
6.
Goth punk, or punk goth, well I didn't know anyone else had any idea it was possible! My definition is what I class myself as, a punk that dresses as a goth with random shite thrown in! Woo
A goth with a flourecent top/trousers/shoes/tights on.
by Libz December 06, 2004
 
7.
Some people who have added to this definition have an extremely poor understanding of what so-called 'goth punk' is. Its roots are in MUSIC, the fashion being something secondary that developed out of and was inspired by the mood the music evokes. Goth punk (also defined as 'deathrock' and part of the 'post-punk' movement) deals with themes of death and mortality, sorrow, despair, surrealism, fantasy, the darker side of the life of society, the supernatural, the occult, romanticism, the effects of psychological terror and trauma - just to name a few of the basics. The music of goth punk, (as opposed to the more traditional extremely fast and anger-based hardcore punk), usually exists within the realm of medium-fast, more danceable rhythms often including tribal tom-based drum sections for the verses. The music also often includes a synthesizer to accompany the drums, bass and guitar, which again, is something more traditional hardcore punk usually refrained from including. The result is more of a moody, introspective sound that takes one into the realms of imagination. The classic, essential deathrock (or goth punk) bands include: Christian Death (the original lineup with vocalist Rozz Williams), early TSOL, UK Decay, The Damned, 45 Grave, Alien Sex Fiend and The Cramps.

Keep in mind that there were also several 'dark punk' bands around the same time that, while not maybe being quite as 'gothic' in some regards, still had enough stylistic similarities to be worthy of mention. They include bands such as: The Adicts, The Adverts, The Mob, False Prophets, Wipers, Chrome and can't forget classics that bridged the gap between hardcore and darkpunk such as Black Flag, Dead Kennedys and The Misfits. One should at least check out the classic goth punk (or, as I prefer to call them, deathrock) bands before making comments on the genre. Keep in mind that while all these bands have similarities, they also have very distinctive sounds that set them apart from the others, as all good artists should, so don't think that just because you've heard one or two of the bands mentioned that you know what goth punk sounds like. Modern goth punk bands worthy of mention are: Cinema Strange and Cauda Pavonis.
Goth Punk: Children of the Night Unite to terrorize the living dead awake from their bleak slumber!
by Daemone Darker March 01, 2009