According to Neil M. Ampel, MD in Journal Watch Infectious Diseases published online on May 19, 2010, a "Fecal Cloud" is what surrounds Clostridium Difficile (C-diff) infected patients in their hospital beds.

Scientists documented that 7 out of 10 C-diff patients had airborne C-diff bacteria or spores surrounding them which likely came from the patients own flatulence which dispersed them into the air.

Clostridium Difficile is pronounced several ways: Klos-tridium Dif fe sell or Dif fe seal.
Neil M. Ampel's observation where he names a "fecal cloud" arises from a published study by Emma Best, et al. in Clinical Infectious Diseases called "The potential for Airborne Dispersal of Clostridium Difficile for symptomatic patients " on June 1, 2010. Since C-diff spores and bacterium are passed out of the body in feces, Neil may have thought this was useful definition of the phenomenon.

This paper supports my theory that C-diff patients then can breathe back in their own C-diff spores and bacterium from their 'fecal cloud" thereby prolonging their disease and/or contributing to their death. Airborne C-diff directly leads to prolonged hospital epidemics and are a leading and quickly increasing cause of Hospital Acquired Infections (HAI).
by AirborneDiseaseGuru April 28, 2011

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