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2.
the suckiest skool at sports, considering that IRWINS WON ON EA/AIS DAY. and could possibly have the ugliest slutiest girls at their skool. nothing else to be said.
episcopal academy sluts are so retarted alll you have to do is meet one of them.
by fords all the way November 11, 2006
 
1.
A private K-12 school located in Merion, Pennsylvania. It was founded in 1785 by Bishop James White, a member of the Protestant Episcopalian Church, and other colonials, many of whom signed the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution. It is currently a leader in academic and athletic excellence in the country.

Athletics

Episcopal's celebrated athletics program satisfies the need to play and to compete. We believe athletics contribute to the well-being of individuals and to our school community. On the field, our students learn honor in victory and grace in defeat, and to accomplish a common goal by relying on others. Above all, they discover the clear thinking and vitality that regular exercise brings, making it a lifetime practice.

EXCELLENCE AND PARTICIPATION
At Episcopal, every student experiences the immeasurable benefits of sustained team effort. Our athletics program offers students 29 Varsity sports. Our athletes compete at the highest levels: each year, we produce Academic All Americans, All Americans, and State, Regional, and Inter Academic League Champions. In addition, many students participate in more than one Varsity sport; 40 receive Tri-Varsity letters annually.

ATHLETIC ACHIEVEMENT
About a third of our seniors each year are recruited by colleges for inter-collegiate athletics. Some represent the United States in the Olympics and Pan American games, and others may be found on the pages of Sports Illustrated. Episcopal's Alumni Athletic Hall of Fame recognizes these achievements.

Mind

The development of each student's mind, body, and spirit begins in PreKindergarten and continues through Senior year. Episcopal's safe and encouraging atmosphere communicates, above all, that learning is fu n. Students learn to focus their thinking, and develop an insatiable desire for knowledge. Episcopal responds with a dynamic, experiential education that asks students to stretch themselves: to learn by doing; to catch their teachers' excitement; to achieve more than they ever imagined. Close contact with faculty enhances the quality of learning. In their roles as student advisors and athletic/extracurricular coaches, our teachers take notice and action- the "teacher-counselor-coach" tradition distinguishes Episcopal faculty.

Spirit

The Episcopal service centers around the liturgy, a word which means "work of the people." That characterizes spirituality on the Episcopal campus... it is work that brings together students, faculty, and staff to reflect, ask hard questions, and celebrate the divine in one another. It means communion, an affirmation of our wide range of faiths, cultures, and traditions, and the powerful conversations we enjoy as we enrich our individual understanding. It creates a safe spiritual space for everyone, from the youngest PreKindergarten student to the self-assured Upper School Senior.

The Move to Newtown Square
In June of 1998, as part of its strategic plan, the Episcopal Academy Board of Trustees directed the "active pursuit of a large tract of land in the western suburbs to serve as a long-term asset and a means of preserving future options."

With this charge, a small group of dedicated visionaries contributed close to $20 million in 2000, enabling us to acquire 123 acres of rolling pasture and mature trees unlike any other on the Main Line. The natural setting is beyond compare and provides a fitting environment for our educational mission.

Furthermore, the site is strategically located in Newtown Square, which is in the heart of the fastest growing region of greater Philadelphia, and yet still only 30 minutes from Center City. We could not have imagined a more perfect location.

Why build an entirely new campus? Episcopal Academy is a far larger, more complex community than it was even twenty years ago.

Today, more students are taking more courses in the same buildings and playing more sports on the same courts and fields than ever before.
Twenty-five years ago, the Academy offered eight Advanced Placement courses; today we offer fourteen. Modern language instruction begins in grade six, not grade eight, and the offerings in history, religion, music, drama, and Upper School mathematics have increased.

The advantages of constructing a new campus become particularly compelling in looking at the constraints facing Episcopal¹s two current campuses.

The Merion campus, established in 1921 to house a boys' school, has now been coeducational for three decades. With coeducation came the need for additional facilities and more field space.

Over the years, we have reworked the campus to the extent that space has allowed. But no matter what we do, the reality is that Merion was intended for a school of 600 students, not the current enrollment of 900.

For all of these reasons, we have concluded that in order to remain among the top independent day schools in America, Episcopal needs a new, larger, unified campus.
Episcopal Academy
Main Line Private Schools
by ford123 November 17, 2006