A reference to an outstanding or extraordinary person; a nickname for such
You know Jodie?? She is such a craic!
by Lolatyou October 31, 2013
Craic (pronounced "crack") is an Irish word with no direct translation in English.

It is generally used to describe fun, banter, a good time, etc.

It is used both in the Irish language and as a slang word in Ireland and Northern Ireland.

It is in no way linked to the English word "crack", although "craic" is often spelled as "crack" by those who are unfamiliar with the Irish spelling.

The Irish word "craiceáilte" (meaning "crazy", often used to describe a person who is wild and eccentric) comes from "craic".

Craic as a slang word in the English language has several applications:

1. To describe a person who is fun to be around

2. To describe a party or other social event that was very enjoyable, often ones involving alcohol

3. To ask someone how they are or to inquire about recent events/gossip

In the Irish language it is generally used to describe a social event
1. Ciara's great craic

2. The party was good craic, We had great craic at the pub

3. What's the craic?, How was the craic last night?

Bhí a lán craic againn (We had great craic)
by Cailín Dána May 28, 2011
Highly versatile word used throughout Ireland (not just the north as has been asserted by some) ,meaning (shared and /or convival) fun, or excitement e.g."great crack at the disco last night!", also news "What's the crack?" It also has a subsidiary meaning of "Funny business". "Don't come that crack with me!" (Don't mess with me) Clearly related to "crack" in standard English, as in "wisecracks,""cracking jokes" etc.While proponents of "Ulster-Scots" (northern Hiberno-English) claim that it was assimilated into Irish and then Hiberno-English from Scots or Ulster-Scots the truth is more complex. The (Gaelic) Irish lexicographer Dineen lists the term "cracaire" (basically an asshole!) neary a century ago while Newnes New Comprehensive Dictionary of the English Languge (circa 1920)ascribes Dutch, Anglo-Saxon and Gaelic antecedents to the word "crack" when used in the sense of fun or chat - but not in Scots (language) except in the sense of "an instant" e.g. "the crack of dawn". The spelling "craic" is of relatively recent origin, probably for pseudo-aesthetic reasons.Whatever its antecedence it is clear that the word has now evolved a uniquely Irish and largely gaelic persona.
Great craic at the disco last night What's the craic?/Any craic? That's no craic! The craic was ninety!craic agus ceol
by Con-John a 'Bheirne March 23, 2010
also known as "Cocaine" in Ireland.
by laughinsohard September 28, 2013
Craic, Having fun, having a good time, the latest info on whats happening in your social circle. Saying whats the craic? is similar to saying whats up? The word craic seems to stem from Northern Ireland slang. But has branched out due to being picked up by tourists who have exported the term.
In a scenario where one was out at a nightclub and had a good time when queried on how good persay your night was you might reply it was great craic. You might then reply any craic last night yourself. Not to be confused with the habit of indulging in cocaine use although some people find this term funny to confuse people who are unaware of what having some craic means.
by Youngen May 26, 2006
irish word for "fun", "Sport".....
What's the craic? (what's up?)
Lets have some craic! (lets go to the pub/disco/anywhere)
by Cully April 01, 2003
Irish, word for fun or a good time, can also be used in conjuction with bad to give bad craic, obviously the opposite of good craic.
Whats the craic?
Was it good craic?
Thats bad craic.
by Joseph Ward June 12, 2004

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