The Dodge Coronet, on which the Charger and Super Bee were based. Originally from the mid '50s, it resurfaced in 1965 as a sporty mid-sized 2-door sedan or 6/9-passenger wagon. It lasted until the early '70s, when it got phased out. By '71, the Charger became its own line and the Super Bee was moved over to the new Charger platform. The performance variant was the R/T model, which started in '67, with the race-prepped 440 Magnum V8 as the standard engine,k and the bulletproof TF727 3spd auto as the standard transmission. Optional were the 425hp 426 Hemi, and the 4spd manual with Hurst linkage (in '70, the manual recieved a competion-type Hurst pistol-grip shifter.) The R/T model was phased out after 1970.
Charger ('66-'74): high-performance, slightly more luxury-oriented version the the Coronet. For '66 and '67, it featured a fastback body and a different dash to differentiate uit from the Coronet. From '68 through '70, it featured a different front-end as the main difference from the Coronet. From 1971 onwards it was completely different, only sharing the B-body (mid-size) base platform with it.
Coronet ('65-'70): A semi-fastback, two-door five-seater with basic ammenities, such as vinyl bucket seats, a floor-shifted 3spd auto, and dual exhausts, except on base models.
Super Bee ('68-'71): A stripped down Coronet (complete withh les insulation), with vinyl bench seat, 3spd manual transmission, hot-cammed 383cid V8, heavy-duty shocks & springs, dual exhausts, and options such as a tachometer and the Hemi.
by Myajd jdg August 14, 2005

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