105 definitions by the centurion

Daredevil is a fictional character, a superhero that appears in comic books published by Marvel Comics. The character was created by writer-editor Stan Lee and artist Bill Everett, with an unspecified amount of input from Jack Kirby, and first appeared in Daredevil #1 (April 1964).

Living in the Hell's Kitchen neighborhood of New York City, Matt Murdock is blinded by a radioactive substance that falls from an oncoming vehicle. While he no longer can see, the radioactive exposure heightens his remaining senses beyond normal human ability. His father, a boxer named Jack Murdock, supports him as he grows up, though Jack is later killed by gangsters after refusing to throw a fight. After donning a yellow and dark red, and later an all dark red costume, Matt seeks out revenge against his father's killers as the superhero Daredevil, fighting against his many enemies including Bullseye and the Kingpin. Daredevil's nickname is "the Man Without Fear".

While Daredevil had been home to the work of comic-book artists such as Everett, Kirby, Wally Wood, John Romita, Sr., and Gene Colan, among others, Frank Miller's influential tenure on the title in the early 1980s cemented the character as a popular and influential part of the Marvel Universe. Daredevil has since appeared in many various forms of media including several animated series, video games and merchandise, and the 2003 feature-length film Daredevil, where he was portrayed by Ben Affleck.
The son of prize fighter Battlin' Jack, Matt Murdock grew up in the relative poverty of Hell's Kitchen with much reverence for his father, who constantly pressed him to study instead of playing with his friends. In turn, they taunted him with the nickname Daredevil since he always went back to studying (or secretly training in his father's gym) instead of doing things with them.

As a boy, Matt witnessed a man about to be hit by a truck and pushed him out of the way but the truck crashed and spilled its cargo of extremely toxic chemicals into his face. He awoke in the hospital blind from the toxins and learned that his other senses were amplified as a result of his loss of sight and was able to see by a radar-like sense using natural sounds around him, giving him ultimate confidence in his surroundings. He met a blind martial arts master named Stick, who taught him to hone his senses and trained him in martial arts among other skills such as free running, meditation and marksmanship.

As an adult, he became a lawyer and opened a law firm with Foggy Nelson while secretly taking on the mantle of Daredevil in order to protect the citizens of Hell's Kitchen and bring justice to the streets as well as the courtroom. His arch nemesis is Kingpin and other side villains include Electro, the psychotic Bullseye, and Daredevil's frequent love interest Elektra.
by The Centurion December 23, 2014
Bio-Booster Armor Guyver (Viz Media) or Guyver (Chuang Yi Publishing) (強殖装甲ガイバー Kyōshoku Sōkō Gaibā?) is a manga series written by Yoshiki Takaya. The Guyver itself is a symbiotic techno-organic (or biomechanical) device that enhances the capabilities of its host.

The manga was originally serialized in Tokuma Shoten's Monthly Shōnen Captain, the first appearance being in the February 18 magazine beginning in 1985. When Shōnen Captain was discontinued in 1997, the manga was picked up by Kadokawa Shoten who subsequently re-released all of the previous tankōbon originally published by Tokuma. The manga is currently serialized in Kadokawa's monthly Shōnen Ace magazine. It has been licensed by Viz Media, Star Comics and Chuang Yi Publishing.

Guyver has been adapted into a single OVA titled Guyver: Out of Control (1986, based loosely on the first four chapters), a 12-episode anime series (1989 to 1992, based roughly on the first four volumes), two live action movies (1991's The Guyver and 1994's Guyver 2: Dark Hero) as well as a 2005 26-episode anime series based on the first 60 chapters (volumes 1-10).
A test type Zoanoid escapes from the Cronos Corporation with three Bio Booster Armor Guyver Units. Cronos soldiers attempt to recover the units from the test type, but are thwarted when the test type detonates a bomb that he has concealed in his bag. The Guyver Units are scattered in the blast. One of the lost Guyver Units, known as "Unit I", lands near two young high school students, Shō Fukamachi and Tetsurō Segawa. The second one is retrieved by Cronos and merges with Oswald A. Lisker to become the second Guyver later on. The final unit falls into the hands of Agito Makishima, who merges with it at an unspecified time. Shō accidentally activates the unit which then painfully merges with him.

Over time, Shō learns more about the Guyver and its abilities. The Guyver is virtually invulnerable, with its only weak point being the Control Metal. With this part intact, it can rebuild the host from the data stored within. If this part is critically damaged, however, the host will be eaten alive by the unit and perish. This is disconcerting and Shō starts to question whether he will ever be free from the Guyver. The situation gradually gets worse with continuously more powerful Zoanoids appearing. This makes it increasingly difficult to protect his vulnerable friends.

As the story progresses it also takes a startling turn, in which Cronos actually succeeds in taking over the world and reshaping it according to its ideals.
by The Centurion December 21, 2014
Gambit is a fictional character, a superhero who appears in comic books published by Marvel Comics. He has held membership in the team known as the X-Men. Created by writer Chris Claremont and artist Jim Lee, the character first appeared briefly in Uncanny X-Men Annual #14 (1990), weeks before a more comprehensive appearance in Uncanny X-Men #266 (August 1990). As of 2013, there have been three attempts at an ongoing title starring the character. Gambit also had two miniseries and starred prominently in the X-Force replacement title during the Age of Apocalypse, Gambit & the X-Ternals.

A mutant, Gambit can mentally create, control and manipulate pure kinetic energy to his every whim and desire. He is also incredibly knowledgeable and skilled in card-throwing, hand-to-hand combat, and the use of a bō.

Few X-Men trusted Gambit, who was originally a professional thief, when he first joined the group. There was consistently a source of stress between him and his on-again, off-again love interest Rogue. This was exacerbated when his connections to villain Mister Sinister were revealed, although some of his team members accept that Gambit honestly seeks redemption.

Often written as a "ladies' man", Gambit has shown a more vulnerable side of himself over the years, especially when it comes to Rogue. Gambit remains fiercely proud of his Louisiana heritage, and speaks in a very thick Cajun accent.
Gambit is a mutant who has the ability to take the potential energy stored in an object and convert it to pure light pink-colored kinetic energy thus “charging” that item with highly explosive results. He prefers to charge smaller objects, such as his ever-present playing cards, as the time required to charge them is greatly reduced and they are much easier for him to throw. The only real limitation to this ability is the time required to charge the object: the larger it is the more time it takes to charge. Most charging takes place through direct skin contact. The power of his explosions is dependent on the mass of the object he is charging, for example, a charged playing card explodes with the force of a grenade. Gambit can also use his mutant abilities to accelerate an object's kinetic energy instead of converting its potential energy; for example, he can charge his Bo staff with enough kinetic energy and power to level a house.

Gambit's ability to tap kinetic energy also grants him incredible superhuman physical abilities (strength, speed, reflexes and reactions, agility, flexibility, dexterity, coordination, balance, and endurance), as his body constantly generates bio-kinetic energy and so is perfectly constructed for constant motion. This gives him an added edge that he has used to his advantage by developing a unique acrobatic fighting style.
by The Centurion November 10, 2014
Spider-Man is a fictional character, a comic book superhero that appears in comic books published by Marvel Comics. Created by writer-editor Stan Lee and writer-artist Steve Ditko, he first appeared in Amazing Fantasy #15 (cover-dated Aug. 1962). Lee and Ditko conceived the character as an orphan being raised by his Aunt May and Uncle Ben, and as a teenager, having to deal with the normal struggles of adolescence in addition to those of a costumed crimefighter. Spider-Man's creators gave him super strength and agility, the ability to cling to most surfaces, shoot spider-webs using wrist-mounted devices of his own invention (which he called "web-shooters"), and react to danger quickly with his "spider-sense", enabling him to combat his foes.

When Spider-Man first appeared in the early 1960s, teenagers in superhero comic books were usually relegated to the role of sidekick to the protagonist. The Spider-Man series broke ground by featuring Peter Parker, the high school student behind Spider-Man's secret identity and with whose "self-obsessions with rejection, inadequacy, and loneliness" young readers could relate. Unlike previous teen heroes such as Bucky and Robin, Spider-Man had no superhero mentor like Captain America and Batman; he thus had to learn for himself that "with great power there must also come great responsibility"—a line included in a text box in the final panel of the first Spider-Man story but retroactively attributed to his guardian, the late Uncle Ben.
A bite from a radioactive spider on a school field trip causes a variety of changes in the body of Peter Parker and gives him superpowers. In the original Lee-Ditko stories, Spider-Man has the ability to cling to walls, superhuman strength, a sixth sense ("spider-sense") that alerts him to danger, perfect balance and equilibrium, as well as superhuman speed and agility. Some of his comic series have him shooting webs from his wrists. Academically brilliant, Parker has expertise in the fields of applied science, chemistry, physics, biology, engineering, mathematics, and mechanics. The character was originally conceived by Stan Lee and Steve Ditko as intellectually gifted, but not a genius; however, later writers have depicted the character as a genius. With his talents, he sews his own costume to conceal his identity, and constructs many devices that complement his powers, most notably mechanical web-shooters. This mechanism ejects an advanced adhesive, releasing web-fluid in a variety of configurations, including a single rope-like strand to swing from, a net to bind enemies, and a simple glob to foul machinery or blind an opponent. He can also weave the web material into simple forms like a shield, a spherical protection or hemispherical barrier, a club, or a hang-glider wing.
by The Centurion November 05, 2014
The Green Hornet was a television show on the ABC US television network.
It aired for one season from 1966-1967, and starred Van Williams as the Green Hornet/Britt Reid and Bruce Lee as Kato.
The show followed the adventures of playboy and media mogul Britt Reid, owner and publisher of the Daily Sentinel. As the masked vigilante Green Hornet, Britt fought crime with the assistance of his martial-artist partner Kato and his weapons-enhanced car the Black Beauty. On police records, Green Hornet is a wanted criminal when in reality Green Hornet pretends to be a criminal in order to infiltrate and battle criminal gangs, leaving them and the incriminating evidence for the police's arrival.

The Green Hornet and Kato crossover into Batman TV series:
Van Williams and Bruce Lee made an appearance as the Green Hornet and Kato in the 1960s Batman TV series.
They appeared in the episode "The Spell of Tut" and also in the two-part second season episodes "A Piece of the Action" and "Batman's Satisfaction".
The Green Hornet and Kato (Van Williams and Bruce Lee) visit Gotham City to bust a counterfeiting stamp ring.

The Green Hornet: (taking routine inventory on his gadgetry before cruising into action) "Hornet gun...check. Hornet sting...check. Let's roll, Kato!"
by The Centurion October 03, 2014
Timothy Peter Dalton (born 21 March 1944 or 1946) is a British actor of film and television.
Dalton is known for portraying James Bond in The Living Daylights (1987) and Licence to Kill (1989), as well as Rhett Butler in the television miniseries Scarlett (1994), an original sequel to Gone with the Wind. In addition, he is known for his roles as Philip II of France in The Lion In Winter; Heathcliff in Wuthering Heights (1970); Edward Rochester in Jane Eyre (1983); Prince Barin in Flash Gordon (1980); and various roles in Shakespearean films and plays such as Romeo and Juliet, King Lear, Henry V, Love's Labour's Lost, Henry IV, Part 1 and Henry IV, Part 2. Recently, he had a voice acting part in Toy Story 3 as Mr. Pricklepants. He has also appeared as Skinner in the mystery comedy film Hot Fuzz; portrayed the recurring character of Alexei Volkoff in the US TV series Chuck; and Rassilon in the Doctor Who two-part episode "The End of Time".
Timothy Dalton's first appearance as 007, The Living Daylights (1987) was critically successful, and grossed more than the previous two Bond films with Moore, as well as contemporary box-office rivals such as Die Hard and Lethal Weapon. However, his second film, Licence to Kill (1989), although almost as successful as its predecessor in most markets, did not perform as well at the U.S. box office, in large part due to a lacklustre marketing campaign, after the title of the film was abruptly changed from Licence Revoked. The main factor for the lack of success in the U.S. was that it was released at the same time as the hugely successful Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade, Tim Burton's Batman, and Lethal Weapon 2, during the summer blockbuster season. In the United Kingdom - one of its critical markets, the film was also hampered by receiving a 15 certificate from the British Board of Film Classification which severely affected its commercial success. Future Bond films, following the resolution of legal and other issues, were all released between 31 October and mid-December, in order to avoid the risk of a summer failure, as had happened to Licence To Kill.
With a worldwide gross of $191 million, The Living Daylights became the fourth most successful Bond film at the time of its release.

Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timothy_Dalton
by The Centurion December 31, 2012
Batman Returns is a 1992 American superhero film directed by Tim Burton. Based on the DC Comics character Batman, it is a sequel to 1989's Batman, with Michael Keaton reprising the title role of Bruce Wayne/Batman. The film introduces the characters of Max Shreck (Christopher Walken), a business tycoon who teams up with the Penguin (Danny DeVito) to take over Gotham City, as well as the character of Catwoman (Michelle Pfeiffer).
### Sources: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Batman_Returns; www.imdb.com/title/tt0103776/trivia?ref_=tt_trv_trv ###
Batman Returns (1992) facts:

1. Neither Tim Burton nor Michael Keaton had been signed up in advance for a sequel; Burton came on board only after the script met all his demands (he hadn't been entirely happy with the first Batman's screenplay), whilst Keaton only agreed to do the second film after a serious hike in salary.

2. It was intended that the character of Robin be introduced in the sequel to Batman. Reportedly, Tim Burton collaborated with DC Comics artist Norm Breyfogle to redesign the Robin costume so that it would coincide with the one planned for the film. Kenner Toys even went so far as to produce a corresponding action figure, but when Robin was eventually written out of the script, Kenner released the toy anyway, as the character newly rendered in the comic books.

3. WILHELM SCREAM: Before Batman straps the dynamite to the strongman, he hurls a goon over a bridge. As the goon flies through the air, he screams the famous Wilhelm scream.

4. Michael Keaton was alleged to have earned $11 million for reprising his role as the Caped Crusader.

5. The final Christmas ball scene is quite symbolic: since it is a masque party all the guests are in disguise. The only two guests there who actually aren't wearing masks are Bruce Wayne and Selina Kyle. This implies that their real personalities are Batman and Catwoman respectively, and that their public appearance without a costume is just a disguise for the society.
by The Centurion December 25, 2012
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