105 definitions by the centurion

Fist of the North Star (北斗の拳 Hokuto no Ken?) is a Japanese manga series written by Buronson and drawn by Tetsuo Hara that was serialized in Weekly Shōnen Jump from 1983 to 1988, spanning 245 chapters, which were initially collected in a 27-volume tankōbon edition by Shueisha. Set in a post-apocalyptic world that has been destroyed by a nuclear war, the story centers around a warrior named Kenshiro, the successor of a deadly martial art style known as Hokuto Shinken, which gives him the ability to kill most adversaries from within through the use of the human body's secret vital points, often resulting in an exceptionally violent and gory death. Kenshiro dedicates his life to fighting against the various ravagers who threaten the lives of the weak and innocent, as well as rival martial artists, including his own "brothers" from the same clan.

The manga was adapted into two anime TV series produced by Toei Animation which aired on Fuji TV affiliates from 1984 through 1988, comprising a combined total of 152 episodes. Several films, OVAs, and video games had been produced as well, including a series of spin-offs centering around other characters from the original story.
Hokuto Shinken (officially translated as the "God Fist of the North Star", among other names) is the primary fighting style in the series. A martial art which is 18 centuries old, Hokuto Shinken uses the body's 708 vital points to destroy or heal from within. The art can only be passed down from one master to a single student, and thus the dispute between Kenshiro and his adoptive brothers becomes the central plot during the first half of the manga's run.
by The Centurion August 30, 2012
How It Should Have Ended (HISHE) began in 2005 when Daniel Baxter and Tommy Watson returned home from the movies and laughingly discussed various alternate endings. Daniel proposed the idea of making short, parody animations of new endings to some of our favorite movies. Tina Alexander previously worked with Daniel on some live action short films and joined the team soon after the completion of the first animation, How Matrix Revolutions Should Have Ended. In July 2005, www.howitshouldhaveended.com was born and within a month we were featured on a nationally syndicated radio show twice and posted on several popular and highly trafficked websites. The company was awarded "Best Internet Parody" for How Superman Should Have Ended in the 2006 Scream Awards on Spike TV and was featured in an MTV® Comedy and Talent Showcase at the Hollywood Improv. We have also been featured as a Yahoo! Profile Pick, appeared in both Fade In and Wired magazines, and were recently highlighted on MTV News and Tubefilter. In September 2009 How It Should Have Ended joined forces with Starz Digital Media to handle all licensing and allow us to release a brand new animation each month. Just recently in April 2010, How It Should Have Ended was honored to win the Streamy Award for Best Animated Web Series!
The following is a HISHE parody of a scene at the end of the 2012 film, The Dark Knight Rises, where ex-cop, Robin John Blake, is walking through the -- vacated -- Batcave and discovers a large transparent cabinet which contains within it a campy multicoloured suit (the Robin costume).
Robin John Blake: Oh, heck no! I'm not wearing that!

Source: www.howitshouldhaveended.com/about-hishe
by The Centurion October 01, 2012
The Suicide Squad is a covert black-ops government strike team under Task Force X. The team is partially made up of imprisoned super-villains who agree to serve as expendable agents on life-threatening top-secret missions for the United States Government. In return, after sufficient service, the prisoners are granted full pardons for their crimes.

The Government does not officially acknowledge the existence of the Suicide Squad, and claims their missions as random supervillain attacks. In addition, there are other non-prisoner members such as Nemesis and Nightshade who participate in the team as part of individual arrangements. The Suicide Squad operate out of Belle Reve prison in Louisiana.

To prevent members escaping in the field, the prisoners are shackled with explosive bracelets programmed to detonate a certain distance from the field leader, who also wears a remote control that can detonate or disengage the bracelets as desired. Typically the field leader will be either Rick Flag or Bronze Tiger.

The group is largely run by Amanda Waller, although at times someone else will act as a cover for her, like when the existence of the Suicide Squad became public. The Suicide Squad has also occasionally left Task Force X and Governmental Control to work freelance.
The Suicide Squad is a team of imprisoned super-villains who perform high-risk missions for the U.S. Government in exchange for commuted sentences. They are formally known as Task Force X. The team's actions are highly classified, and the government is able to deny any involvement by claiming that they are not responsible for the damages of a random super-villain attack. Their commander is Amanda Waller, who runs the organization out of Belle Reve prison. The Suicide Squad was created by Robert Kanigher and Ross Andru, first appearing in Brave and the Bold #25. (1959)
by The Centurion October 18, 2014
Batman is a 1989 American superhero film directed by Tim Burton. Based on the DC Comics character of the same name, the film stars Michael Keaton in the title role, as well as Jack Nicholson, Kim Basinger, Robert Wuhl, Michael Gough, Pat Hingle, Billy Dee Williams, and Jack Palance. The film, in which Batman deals with the rise of a costumed criminal known as "The Joker", was the first installment of Warner Bros.' initial Batman film series.
Batman (1989 film):
(Batman dangles a mugger over the side of a building)
Nic: Don't kill me! Don't kill me, man! Don't kill me! Don't kill me, man!
Batman: I'm not going to kill you. I want you to do me a favor. I want you to tell all your friends about me.
Nic: What are you?
Batman: I'm Batman.

(Jack Napier is confronted with Batman for the first time)
Jack Napier: Nice outfit!

The Joker: I have given a name to my pain, and it is Batman.

The Joker: Never rub another man's rhubarb.

The Joker: Tell me something, my friend. You ever dance with the devil in the pale moonlight?
Bruce Wayne: What?
The Joker: I always ask that of all my prey. I just... like the sound of it.
(shoots him)

The Joker: Have you shipped a million of those things?
Scientist at Axis Chemicals: Yes sir!
The Joker: Ship 'em ALL! We're gonna take 'em out a WHOLE NEW DOOR!

The Joker: And now, folks, it's time for "Who do you trust!" Hubba, hubba, hubba! Money, money, money! Who do you trust? Me? I'm giving away free money. And where is the Batman? HE'S AT HOME WASHING HIS TIGHTS!

(the Batwing is flying at The Joker)
The Joker: Come on, you gruesome son of a bitch! Come to me. Ha ha ha ha ha ha! Come on!

Batman: I'm going to kill you!
The Joker: You IDIOT! You made me. Remember? You dropped me into that vat of chemicals. That wasn't easy to get over, and don't think that I didn't try.
Batman: I know you did.
(punches him again)
by The Centurion July 06, 2012
Sir Christopher Frank Carandini Lee, CBE, CStJ, (born 27 May 1922) is an English actor and singer. Lee initially portrayed villains and became best known for his role as Count Dracula in a string of popular Hammer Horror films. Other notable roles include Francisco Scaramanga in the James Bond film The Man with the Golden Gun (1974), Saruman in The Lord of the Rings film trilogy (2001–2003) and The Hobbit film trilogy (2012–2014), and Count Dooku in the final two films of the Star Wars prequel trilogy (2002, 2005).
He was knighted for services to drama and charity in 2009, and received the BAFTA Fellowship in 2011. Lee considers his most important role to be that of Pakistan's founder Muhammad Ali Jinnah in the biopic Jinnah (1998), and his best role to be Lord Summerisle in the British cult classic The Wicker Man (1973), which he also considers his best film.
Always noted as an actor for his deep, strong voice, he has, more recently, also taken to using his singing ability, recording various opera and musical pieces between 1986 and 1998 and the symphonic metal album Charlemagne: By the Sword and the Cross in 2010 after having worked with several metal bands since 2005. The heavy metal follow-up titled Charlemagne: The Omens of Death was released on 27 May 2013. He was honoured with the "Spirit of Metal" award in the 2010 Metal Hammer Golden God awards ceremony.
Christopher Lee played Saruman in the The Lord of the Rings film trilogy. In the commentary, he states he had a decades-long dream to play Gandalf but that he was now too old and his physical limitations prevented his being considered. The role of Saruman, by contrast, required no horseback riding and much less fighting. Lee had met J.R.R. Tolkien once (making him the only person in The Lord of the Rings film trilogy to have done so) and makes a habit of reading the novels at least once a year. In addition, he performed for the album The Lord of the Rings: Songs and Poems by J.R.R. Tolkien in 2003. Lee's appearance in the final film in the trilogy, The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King, was cut from the theatrical release, but the scene was reinstated in the extended edition.
The Lord of the Rings marked the beginning of a major career revival that continued in Star Wars Episode II: Attack of the Clones (2002) and Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith (2005), in which he played the villainous Count Dooku. His autobiography states that he did much of the swordplay himself, though a double was required for the more vigorous footwork.

Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christopher_Lee
by The Centurion December 31, 2012
X-Men: First Class is a 2011 American superhero film directed by Matthew Vaughn and produced by Bryan Singer, based on the X-Men characters appearing in Marvel Comics. The fifth installment in the X-Men series, the film acts as a prequel for the original X-Men trilogy, being set primarily in 1962 during the Cuban Missile Crisis. It focuses on the relationship between Charles Xavier (Professor X) and Erik Lensherr (Magneto), and the origin of their groups—the X-Men and the Brotherhood of Mutants, respectively. The film stars James McAvoy as Xavier and Michael Fassbender as Lensherr, leading an ensemble cast that includes Kevin Bacon, January Jones, Rose Byrne, Jennifer Lawrence, Zoë Kravitz, Nicholas Hoult and Lucas Till.
X-Men: First Class (2011)
Erik Lehnsherr: Excuse me, I'm Erik Lehnsherr.
Professor Charles Xavier: Charles Xavier.
Logan: Go fuck yourself.

Erik Lehnsherr: (before Charles uses Cerebro for the first time) What an adorable lab rat you make, Charles.
Professor Charles Xavier: Don't spoil this for me, Erik.
Erik Lehnsherr: I've been a lab rat. I know when I see one.

(about the Class going into action)
Professor Charles Xavier: They're just kids...
Erik Lehnsherr: No, they WERE kids. Shaw has his army, we need ours.

Erik Lehnsherr: (Shaw's mind is frozen by Charles) If you're in there, I'd like you to know that I agree with every word you said. We are the future. But, unfortunately, you killed my mother. This is what we're gonna do.
Professor Charles Xavier: No. Please, Erik, no.
Erik Lehnsherr: I am going to count to three and I'm going to move the coin. One.
(moves the coin at Shaw's head)
Professor Charles Xavier: Please, Erik.
Erik Lehnsherr: Two. Three.

(Magneto halts the missile barrage and directs it upon the fleet)
Professor Charles Xavier: Erik, you said yourself we're the better men. This is the time to prove it. There are thousands of men on those ships who are just following orders.
Erik Lehnsherr: I've been at the mercy of men just following orders. Never again.
by The Centurion June 16, 2012
The Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) is an American media franchise and shared fictional universe that is centered on a series of superhero films, independently produced by Marvel Studios and based on characters that appear in publications by Marvel Comics. The franchise has expanded to include comic books, short films, and a television series. The shared universe, much like the original Marvel Universe in comic books, was established by crossing over common plot elements, settings, cast, and characters. Clark Gregg has appeared the most in the franchise, portraying Phil Coulson, an original character to the MCU.

The first film released in the MCU was Iron Man (2008), which began the first phase of films, culminating in Marvel's The Avengers (2012). Phase Two began with Iron Man 3 (2013), and is expected to conclude with Avengers: Age of Ultron (2015). Marvel is also preparing Phase Three, beginning with the release of Ant-Man (2015). The universe began to expand with the release of the first official tie-in comics in 2010, and saw further expansion with the Marvel One-Shots direct-to-video short films in 2011 and the TV series Marvel's Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. in the 2013–14 season. Marvel has multiple films and television projects in various stages of development.

The franchise as a whole ranks as the second highest-grossing film franchise of all time and has inspired other film studios with comic book character film rights to attempt to create similar shared universes.
The following film scene, from Iron Man (2008), is an example of the Marvel Cinematic Universe in action:

after end credits
Tony Stark: arriving home Evening, JARVIS!
Jarvis: voice distorted Welcome home, sir...
Stark stops as he sees a figure in his living room
Nick Fury: "I am Iron Man". You think you're the only superhero in the world? Mr. Stark, you've become part of a bigger universe. You just don't know it yet.
Tony Stark: Who the hell are you?
Nick Fury: Nick Fury. Director of SHIELD.
Tony Stark: Ah.
Nick Fury: I'm here to talk to you about the Avenger Initiative.
by The Centurion October 08, 2014

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