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28 definitions by david lincoln brooks

 
1.
Yes, it does in fact mean "tits and ass", but it rarely is referring to the anatomy of just one female. It is used more in a descriptive generality... usually used to characterize a particular genre of entertainment, e.g. movies, TV, pop music, etc. It is often used pejoratively.
Wow, MTV used to be so cool. Now, it's all rappers and T and A.

Have you seen the amount of T and A that has crept into video games these days?
by david lincoln brooks December 02, 2005
 
2.
This phrase is not new; the full phrase is "to take the Mickey (out of someone)"
Britons have been using this figure of speech for decades, if not centuries. A "Mickey" of course, is a "Mick": a pejorative, racist term for an Irishman (so nicknamed because so many Irish surnames begin with Mc- or Mac-) It is a common stereotype, in both the UK and USA, that Irish men have volatile tempers, like to brawl, and make good boxers. So, To "take the Mickey (out of someone)" means to take the fight, the vigor, the gravity, the self-importance out of them, by mocking them, usually in a very subtle way.
Headmaster: "...so I expect you boys to comport yourself with the full dignity befitting students of this establishment of secondary learning."

Student: "Oh yes, we will sir. We'll even wear our school blazers to bed."

Headmaster: "If I didn't know better, I'd think you were trying to take the Mickey out of me!"
by david lincoln brooks September 28, 2006
 
3.
This is a phrase taken directly from the 1980 dance pop song, "Your Own Private Idaho" by the outrageous party band, the B-52's.

It means "living inside an Idaho potato", or a very small space. Metaphorically, it refers to someone who is not paying attention because he is daydreaming, or under the influence, or otherwise wrapped up within his own very narrow sphere of interest or frame of reference.
Car Driver: Damn! That guy just pulled out in front of me as if I weren't here! We almost crashed!

Passenger: Yeah, he's just yakking away on his cellphone, in his own private Idaho.
by david lincoln brooks March 24, 2006
 
4.
(South African vulgar English slang. Derived from Afrikaans. Literally means "box", slang term for a vagina. Extremely pejorative.)

(Pronounced to rhyme with the English words "do us")

A very stupid, obstreporous, despicable, disagreeable person, often a male. An "asshole" or "dickhead".
Example 1: "Ag, that ouk is a real doos, ek se."

Translation: "Man, that guy is a real asshole, I'm telling you."

Example 2: "Listen, stop being such a doos."

Translation: "Listen, stop being such a foolish idiot."
by david lincoln brooks November 15, 2010
 
5.
From the world of commercial perfumery: When a particular fragrance, masculine or feminine, has been a huge success, its makers will often try to capitalize on its success by creating "spinoff" fragrances. These "spinoffs", called flankers, might be similar to the original olfactorily, but with a different spin or variation put on it. "Light" versions, "sport" versions, "veil" versions are common types of flanker.
Traditional SHALIMAR perfume seems heavy and musky to a whole new generation of Millennial women accustomed to fragrances which smell detergent, aquatic and ultra "clean". With this in mind, the company's house, GUERLAIN OF PARIS, has launched a new flanker: a much lighter version of the classic 1925 sexbomb, pruned of its muskier elements, called simply SHALIMAR LIGHT.
by david lincoln brooks July 20, 2008
 
6.
(South African English slang. Derived from Afrikaans. Literally, "sweet" or "tasty".)

"lekker" means tasty or pleasurable or very excellent. Originally referred to food, but used widely to describe any excellent or pleasurable thing.
Man, we had a lekker jorl last night.

Translation: Man, we had an extremely pleasurable excursion or night's partying last night.

"Man, the chow in Cape Town is lekker, ek se."

Translation: "Man, the food in Cape Town is extremely delicious, I tell you!"
by david lincoln brooks November 15, 2010
 
7.
(South African surfer's English. Derived from Afrikaans.)

To like or prefer someone or something. Rhymes with "smock". Literally means "to taste".
Ag, nought, man, I don't smaak that ouk, ek se.

"Oh, no, man, I don't like that dude, I have to say."
by david lincoln brooks November 12, 2010