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5 definitions by daniel from garland

 
1.
Jeffrey Hyman (May 19, 1951 – April 15, 2001), better known as Joey Ramone, was the vocalist for the legendary punk rock group The Ramones. He and fellow band-mate Johnny Ramone were the only two members who stayed with the band until their retirement in 1996.


Joey RamoneJoey grew up in Forest Hills, Queens. His mother, Charlotte, encouraged an interest in music in both Joey and his brother Mitchell Hyman a/k/a Mickey Leigh. Joey was a fan of The Who, among other bands (particularly "oldies"). He took up drums at 13, playing throughout his teen years, and was originally the drummer for the Ramones. Upon Tommy Ramone's suggestion that some particular parts of the band didn't work, he became the vocalist. Joey and his bandmates attended Forest Hills High School.

He was said to be the "heart and soul" of The Ramones, and his favorite songs they had performed were often the ballads and love songs. C.J. Ramone called Joey the "hippie of the group".

After the heyday of the Ramones in the mid-70s, they remained only an underground act throughout the 80s and 90s.

Joey was distinctive due to his towering height of 6 feet 6 inches, unbelievable skinniness, and long shock of black hair that almost completely obscured his face. Joey was known to have suffered from obsessive-compulsive disorder. Joey was born sterile, so he never fathered any children. He also never married.

Joey did not speak to guitarist Johnny Ramone for many years. The two fell out when Johnny "stole" Joey's girlfriend Linda, whom Johnny later married. They were also strongly averse to each other's politics as well, Joey being a left-leaning liberal while Johnny was a staunch conservative. The pair never made up with each other.

Joey died of lymphoma on April 15, 2001. He apparently had had the disease for a long time; he was sighted at a New York City cancer clinic that specializes in lymphoma in the mid 1990s.

Joey was the first mainstream-acknowledged punk star to die whose death was not due to a drug overdose or suicide, though his addiction issues were much publicised in various books on the Ramones. His passing was a sad shock to many, and seemed to signal the end of a generation. Countless memorials, both by fans and the rockers he influenced, followed.

His solo album Don't Worry About Me was released in 2002 and features the single "What a Wonderful World", his cover of the Louis Armstrong classic. In addition, this album featured a song entitled "Maria Bartiromo" in tribute to the popular CNBC anchor.

On November 30, 2003, Joey Ramone Place was officially named a new street in New York City. It is located alongside the block where The Ramones got their start at CBGB. His birthday is annually celebrated by rock and roll nightclubs, hosted in New York City by his mother and brother.

joey ramone kicks so much ass!
by daniel from garland October 10, 2005
199 17
 
2.
The Misfits were a punk rock band formed in 1977 in the town of Lodi, New Jersey and originally led by singer Glenn Danzig (born Glenn Anzalone).

Glenn was very interested in Marilyn Monroe, and took the band's name from The Misfits, Monroe's last film. The band's early lyrical and graphical focus was on retro (1930s-'50s) science fiction, horror films, and B-movies.

The early Misfits were often quite melodic, featuring Danzig's versatile singing, which had a style rooted in Italian tenors such as Mario Lanza and in 1950's doo wop. Early Misfits songs tended to have catchy, sing-along choruses backed by poorly recorded, sloppy instrumentals. The band began as a largely untrained ensemble. The song "Last Caress" (a very rare track for years) is now commonly regarded as the epitome of an early-Misfits song, with blaring instruments and Danzig's melodic vocals finding a medium between Frank Sinatra and the Sex Pistols (whose notoriously musically untalented bassist, Sid Vicious, at one point offered the rest of the band to back him as a solo artist).

By the original band's last album, Earth A.D., they had become a hardcore punk band, with Danzig's standout vocal tone floating over a torrent of thrashing guitar, bass, and drums.

It is useful to think of the early Misfits as a band of Jersey-Italians who were strangely attracted to punk due to the trends of the time, rather than as a traditional 'punk band'. While Danzig lived with his mother in Lodi and was supported by her during the band's early career, Jerry and Doyle Caiafa helped finance the band by working long shifts at the family lumber yard, later founding a knife factory in rural Vernon Township (which often employed later members such as Robo, a citizen of Colombia). The Misfits seldom mixed with other New Jersey punk bands, creating their own small scene locally, while holding early acclaim in New York and expanding it nationally, in part thanks to mailing lists and other networking, including their once-small, later-considerable 'Fiend Club' fan club.

The original Misfits broke up in 1983, having released several 7" singles and 12" records, all of which were DIY limited-edition and most of which were hand-assembled by the band, that have long been considered prime collectors' items. Epigones from Lodi, New Jersey, include the bands Mourning Noise and Rosemary's Babies, both of whom released records.

The band often wore ghoulish makeup when performing, and bassist Jerry Only invented a hairstyle called the devilock which is still worn by fans today.

woah the misfits kick major ass with we are 138 that song is soo cool.
by daniel from garland October 10, 2005
169 35
 
3.
The Hoshino Gakki company begun in 1908 as a musical instrument sales division of the Hoshino Shoten bookstore company. In 1935 they began manufacturing their own stringed instruments. The company had little presence in the Western world until the mid-1960s.

In 1954, Harry Rosenbloom opened a music store in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania, northwest of Philadelphia. Due to the post-World War II music boom, his sales soon outstripped his inventory, and he began a company called Elger Guitars in an attempt to manufacture enough guitars to fill his needs. The Elger Guitar company made a relatively small number of hand-built, high quality guitars through the early 1960s.

By 1965 Rosenbloom had decided to stop manufacturing guitars and chose to become the exclusive North American distributor for Hoshino Gakki instruments. At the time, the phrase "made in Japan" was considered to have negative connotations of low quality, so Hoshino Gakki and Rosenbloom wanted to distribute the instruments under a "non-Japanese" name. Hoshino had recently acquired a small Spanish guitar company named Ibanez, and it was decided to market the instruments under this brand name. In 1971 Hoshino purchased Elger Guitars, renaming the company "Ibanez U.S.A." and retaining the company headquarters in Bensalem, Pennsylvania as a distribution and quality-control center.

In the early 1970s Ibanez began making guitars that were almost exact copies of popular models by Gibson, Fender and Rickenbacker. Using somewhat cheaper materials and greater automation in manufacturing, they were able to sell these guitars for a significantly lower price than the originals. The low price combined with the relatively high quality of the guitars made these models very popular. Many guitar aficionados feel that the early- and mid-70s mark a low point in the quality of guitars from the major manufacturers, which helped contribute to the popularity of the Ibanez copies. These guitars have become known as "lawsuit" guitars and have become somewhat collectible.

The actual lawsuit referred to was brought by the Norlin Corporation, the parent company of Gibson guitars, in 1977, and was based on an Ibanez headstock design that had been discontinued by 1976. Ibanez settled out of court, and by 1978 had begun making guitars from their own designs.

Abandoning the strategy of copying "classic" electric guitar designs, the newer models began incorporating more modern elements into their design, such as radical body shapes, slimmer necks and flatter fingerboards (which allowed for faster playing), higher-output electronics and colorful finishes. This led to an increasing popularity with heavy metal musicians. The company also began an extensive program of consulting with well-known guitar players and creating signature models made to the players' specifications
Steve Vai
Paul Gilbert
Joe Satriani
Daron Malakian of System of a down
John Petrucci
Andy Timmons
George Benson
John Scofield
Pat Metheny
James Shaffer and Brian Welch from Koßn
Mike Mushok of Staind
Noodles of The Offspring
all play ibanez guitars or basses
by daniel from garland October 10, 2005
165 62
 
4.
The Ramones were a hugely influential punk rock band, formed in Forest Hills, Queens, New York in January 1974. They played their first concert at the Performance Studio in New York on March 30, 1974. They led the New York punk movement and are often credited with forming the musical foundation of punk (see protopunk). The original band members all adopted Ramone as a surname although they were not actually brothers:

Joey Ramone (May 19, 1951 - April 15, 2001) (real name Jeffrey Hyman) (vocals)
Johnny Ramone (October 8, 1948 - September 15, 2004) (real name John Cummings) (guitar)
Dee Dee Ramone (September 18, 1952 - June 5, 2002) (real name Douglas Glenn Colvin) (bass guitar) (1974-1989)
Tommy Ramone (January 29, 1952) (real name Thomas Erdelyi) (drums) (1974-1978)
Later band members also adopted the name:

Marky Ramone (July 15, 1956) (real name Marc Bell) (Later replaced Tommy and Elvis on drums) (1978-1983, 1987-1996)
Richie Ramone (August 11, 1957) (real name Richard Reinhardt) (Later replaced Marky on drums) (1983-1987)
Elvis Ramone (November 24, 1955) (real name Clem Burke) (Later replaced Richie on drums) (1987)
C.J. Ramone (October 8, 1965) (real name Christopher John Ward) (Later replaced Dee-Dee on bass) (1989-1996)
An earlier member, Ritchie, left the band before the first recording (not related to the Richie Ramone, above). "Here lies Ritchie Ramone" can be seen on a cartoon drawing of a gravestone on the innersleeve of the 'Rocket to Russia' album

Colvin (Dee Dee Ramone) suggested the name, inspired by the fact that Paul McCartney used to call himself Paul Ramone (although some accounts say Paul Ramon) when he was in the Silver Beatles.

The Ramones pioneered a straightforward, stripped-down sound that was a far cry from the virtuosic musicianship and complex instrumentation that 1970s rock music had become known for. It heralded a raw, loud, fast and direct sound often reminiscent of 1950s-early 1960s rock and roll or bubblegum pop. Joey Ramone has stated the Ramones were rather taken with the Bay City Rollers' hit song "Saturday Night," and set out to imitate its catchy, sing-a-long quality.
woah the ramones kick soooo much ass!
by daniel from garland October 10, 2005
93 11
 
5.
g-town can be any city that starts with g or most likely used here in garland as garland high schools nick name
i am going to g-town baby!
by daniel from garland October 11, 2005
31 34