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27 definitions by caitlin perry

 
1.
What a cat uses to make it's meows.
Some meow boxes are louder than others,
and on rare occasions, one can come broken,
sounding like a, "rahhh".
Connor: what's wrong Ponnor?
Ponnor: rahhhh
Connor: Oh, sounds like your meow box is broken.
Dad: Connor! Leave my precious alone!
by Caitlin Perry January 13, 2007
92 14
 
2.
Deseret Industries.
A thrift store similar to Value Village; except with a better selection due to the fact that it is not as well known.
It is usually referred to as "the D.I." or "Deseret" (Dez-er-ret) and is sometimes inncorrectly pronounced "dez-er-ray".
One of the stores is featured in the movie "Napoleon Dynamite".

• There are 46 D.I. stores throughout 7 western states.

• All are non-profit, self-sustaining enterprises that process millions of donated goods every year.

• The stores are open to the public and operate on the principles of thrift, work, giving and self-reliance.

• The name "Deseret," was the name proposed in the 1840s by Mormon settlers for what later became Utah. It was taken from the Book of Mormon, and is a term suggesting the industrious nature of the honeybee.

• Deseret Industries’ primary purpose is employment rehabilitation. Workers who know little or no English, who lack job training, or who are elderly or disabled are the primary beneficiaries.

• Jobs at Deseret Industries include sorting donated clothing and other items and preparing them for sale, pricing and stocking merchandise, helping customers at a cash register and building furniture.

• Trainers oversee 12 to 15 people who are being taught job skills. The trainees work according to an "individual self-reliance plan" that is tailored to give them the skills they need. Salaries start at minimum wage.

• One difference between today’s Deseret Industries program and the original is that all the trainees in 1938 were Church members. Today, nearly 30% are not Latter-day Saints.

• In addition to on-the-job instruction, trainees take classes for which they are paid. Course work includes technical classes, college courses and internships. Deseret Industries also teaches English to immigrants from many countries and assists them in adapting to a new culture. Classes are held on-site, at outside businesses and at local schools.

• Trainers’ salaries, programs and equipment are paid from revenues generated by the sale of donated goods.

• Most trainees complete the program in about a year, then Church Employment Resource Centers assist them with job placement. More than 6,000 trainees work through the Deseret Industries system every year.

• During any given week, about 2,700 trainees are enrolled at all Deseret Industries facilities combined. At the new Tooele Deseret Industries, an estimated 100 people will be trained each year.

• Annually, millions of pounds of clothing are sent out from Deseret Industries to the Church Humanitarian Service Center, which in turn aids people around the world — regardless of faith. The Church also partners with other agencies and religious institutions to provide relief.

• Bishops can provide clothing, furniture and other essentials from Deseret Industries to people who cannot afford them and are in need.

***(some information courtesy of www.lds.org)
Nathan: I really want some new shirts, but I'm almost broke!
Caitlin: Well then, let's go to the D.I. after school.
Nathan: Great idea! Their bargain prices and quantity in selection are unbeatable!
by Caitlin Perry January 13, 2007
64 12
 
3.
The third level of friendship between 2 friends;
At this level they can eat Jack in the Box buttermilk sausage sandwiches with eachother, without the need of presence by any other, usual tag-a-longs.

• level 1: becoming friends; usually through other friends
• level 2: when one friend is able to sit shotty during the absence of the other's boo
• level 3: (see above)
CAITLIN: we've never had lunch together, just the 2 of us
CONNOR: Let's eat buttermilk sausage sandwiches!
CAITLIN: This is a new step on the ladder of our friendship
CONNOR: yes. me and you are now buttermilk buddies...it's the third level of friendship.
by Caitlin Perry January 13, 2007
64 13
 
4.
On rare occassions, a peculiar thing happens where after leaving a McDonald's sandwich in your car for an extended period of time, the meat turns into maggots.

Although most would have you believe that maggots hatch from eggs laid by flies, this is false.
Recent studies by wades have proven that maggots are a product of spontaneous generation and in fact form themselves from organic matter; in this case, meat.

There are many types of organic material that maggots are created from, however, those which form in meat, are the most frequently sighted, and it is common knowledge that they with out a doubt, do exist.
CONNOR: ..when he went back to the car, the meat had turned into maggots!!!
SMART PEOPLE: no...Connor, that doesn't make sense.
CONNOR: shut your MOUTH! i'm asking my dad!
DAD: Connor, i'm on your side, 100% because you're always right. A meat maggot...makes sense to me, because I'm a wade.
NATHAN'S SMART MOM: The flies lay their eggs in the meat.
CONNOR: *speechless*
by Caitlin Perry January 30, 2007
54 11
 
5.
pronounced MOW (as in, to mow the lawn) +th

The intense pronunciation of the word 'mouth', is often used when silencing another individual offensively by telling them to shut their's.
This term is widely spreading it's use around the Pacific Northwest and puget sound area.

First recognized by the Boston native comedian Dane Cook on his "Harmful if Swallowed" comedy tour.

..."We are going to play a little game I just made up. We are going to turn all the lights off and play, 'Who's in my Moewth' "
-Dane Cook
by caitlin Perry March 22, 2007
31 2
 
6.
An adjective used to describe something that is awesome or the best.
the "cake"
the "Ultimate"
the "ish"
CAITLIN: I got an ipod for Christmas, what'd you get?
TREVOR: WELL...I got an iphone.
CAITLIN: DANG! that takes the daddy hat!!
by caitlin Perry March 22, 2007
34 9
 
7.
The correct spelling of the word 'windmill', according to it's typical pronunciation.

This variant of the word is commonly used by those of the Pacific Northwest and Puget Sound regions, whose accents are considered to be "very neutral" to most Americans and Canadians.

The Northwest's accent is one of the closest living accents to conservative General American English.

It lacks the Northern Cities Vowel Shift, and does not participate as strongly in the California Vowel Shift, or the Canadian raising as do other regional accents.

Because of its lack of any distinguishing vowel shift, the accent is very similar to and hard to distinguish from conservative speakers in other dialect regions especially the Northern Midlands, California, and the praries.
STEPHANIE: I'm from Holland
LACEY: is that where they have those giant fans?
STEPHANIE: yes, they're called windmeals.
LACEY: sav
by caitlin Perry March 22, 2007
33 9