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4 definitions by Nite of Nat

 
1.
As the capital of California--the state with the largest population which boasts the world's 4th largest economy--Sacramento is a thriving city sprawled in the north-central part of the state just 1 1/2 hours inland from the San Francisco Bay Area. While Sacramento can reach temperatures of 110 degrees or higher in the summer months and has big trucks a-plenty, it has a lot going for it as well: well paying jobs, decent, clean and safe suburbs, good schools and a multitude of ways to have fun make Sacramento one of the most desirable family cities in America. While Sac Town may not have much of a scene for the under 40 crowd there are still places where young people can hang out and have fun. The American River is a popular party location, Sac State and UC Davis (in nearby Davis) supply the area's college scene and numerous restaurants, coffee and yogurt shops, bookstores and clubs provide ideal settings for the youth to meet and socialize. I grew up in Sacto and I'm always open to the idea of moving back there and settling down when I'm over 40 and have a family.
PA soccer mom: Honey, I'm tired of this depressing eastern landscape. I hate these harsh winters and I'm tired of looking at abandoned textile factories and farms on my way to work. Let's move to Sacramento, CA. I heard that it's the mecca of suburbia.

PA office park dad: You're right darling. The jobs pay very well out there and there aren't as many minorities. Besides, we can sit in our air conditioned house all day and stare at our neighbors through our mini-blinds. What is more fun than that?

PA soccer mom: But...you know there are those rednecks to worry about.

PA office park dad: Ah, don't worry about them. We'll live in Rocklin where the only rednecks we'll see will be the guy who looks like Axl Rose mowing our lawn.

PA family: Yay! Let's move to Sacramento!
by Nite of Nat September 30, 2007
 
2.
Poverty Belt is a growing term being used by people who live in the northeastern US to describe Central New York. Central New York is a geographical region of upstate New York which lies between the Catskill mountains and the Adirondacks. It is comprised of the cities Albany, Utica, Syracuse, Binghamton, Buffalo and Rochester (which is often referred to as Crotch-Chester). Common characteristics of this region which account for the name include scarcity of jobs, high unemployment, a shrinking population and a crumbling infrastructure. The "belt" part of the term comes from the way the aforementioned cities are horizontally situated close to the New York state thruway which runs from East to West through the middle part of the state.
-Where do you come from?
-I grew up in the Poverty Belt?
-Where's that?
-Central New York.

-Syracuse a tough place to make a living.
-Why's that.
-It's situated in the Poverty Belt.
-The what?
by Nite of Nat October 07, 2007
 
3.
Poverty Belt is a growing term being used by people who live in the northeastern US to describe Central New York. Central New York is a geographical region of upstate New York which lies between the Catskill mountains and the Adirondacks. It is comprised of the cities Albany, Utica, Syracuse, Binghamton, Buffalo and Rochester (which is often referred to as Crotch-Chester). Common characteristics of this region which account for the sobriquet include scarcity of jobs, high unemployment, a shrinking population and a crumbling infrastructure. The "belt" part of the term comes from the way the aforementioned cities are horizontally situated close to the New York state thruway which runs from East to West through the middle part of the state.
-Where do you come from?
-I grew up in the Poverty Belt?
-Where's that?
-Central New York.

-Syracuse a tough place to make a living.
-Why's that.
-It's situated in the Poverty Belt.
-The what?
by Nite of Nat September 29, 2007
 
4.
A Freeman (who can also be a woman) is a conservative working-or middle-class American individual who drinks domestic beer, likes to fish and hunt and enjoys football, baseball and NASCAR. A Freeman will often display a disproportionate amount of pride relative to his or her social and economic status. This pride often manifests itself as a penchant for big vehicles with large wheels which gives the impression to the Freeman that he or she is "riding high" or intimidating to everybody on the road who is driving smaller vehicles. Many Freemen harbor the paranoid suspicion that the government wants to confiscate their firearms so they will bumper sticker their cars with placards that read, "You can pry my gun from my cold dead hands." Freemen comprise the majority of patronage for many US companies like WalMart and McDonald's and are the largest contributors to state and Indian reservation gambling enterprises across the country. Ninety percent of white prison inmates are Freemen and 9 out of 10 country albums are purchased by Freemen (the other 1 out of 10 country albums are purchased by music critics who then sell or donate that country music album to a secondhand music-or book-store). While often parodied on TV (SNL's skit "Appalachian ER," for instance) and in larger sophisticated cities like Boston and L.A., Freemen are widely respected in most parts of Middle America where they are viewed as a type of vital backbone to the nation. Without Freemen WalMarts would be hard pressed to find cashiers, the truck driving industry would grind to a halt and practically every casino outside of Las Vegas and Atlantic City would have to file for bankruptcy.
-The skit Appalachian ER on SNL is offensive to Freemen everywhere.
-Why do you care? You're not a Freeman.
-I know, but my dad is a Freeman. He likes Johnny Cash, smokes Marlboros and drives a Ford F-150.

I'm proud to be an American! I'm a Freeman!
by Nite of Nat September 29, 2007