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18 definitions by Juliet

 
1.
Personality disorder in which an individual shows a generalized pattern of instability in interpersonal relationships, self-image, and observable emotions, and significant impulsiveness.
Relationships with others are intense but stormy and unstable with marked shifts of feelings and difficulties in maintaining intimate, close connections. The person may manipulate others and often has difficulty with trusting others. There is also emotional instability with marked and frequent shifts to an empty lonely depression or to irritability and anxiety. There may be unpredictable and impulsive behavior which might include excessive spending, promiscuity, gambling, drug or alcohol abuse, shoplifting, overeating or physically self-damaging actions such as suicide gestures. The person may show inappropriate and intense anger or rage with temper tantrums, constant brooding and resentment, feelings of deprivation, and a loss of control or fear of loss of control over angry feelings. There are also identity disturbances with confusion and uncertainty about self-identity, sexuality, life goals and values, career choices, friendships. There is a deep-seated feeling that one is flawed, defective, damaged or bad in some way, with a tendency to go to extremes in thinking, feeling or behavior. Under extreme stress or in severe cases there can be brief psychotic episodes with loss of contact with reality or bizarre behavior or symptoms. Even in less severe instances, there is often significant disruption of relationships and work performance. The depression which accompanies this disorder can cause much suffering and can lead to serious suicide attempts.
by Juliet February 22, 2005
 
2.
Prologue:
It is 1911 and the contents of the Paris Opera House are being auctioned off. Present are the auctioneer, porters and bidders. Raoul, now seventy years old and in a wheelchair, buys a poster and a music box. As the auctioneer displays the Opera House chandelier, he explains that it is connected with the legend of The Phantom of the Opera. With a flash of light, the audience is flung back in time, when the Paris Opera was at its height.

Act 1:

We are thrust in the middle of a rehearsal for the opera Hannibal. Monsieur Lefèvre, the retiring manager of the Opera, is showing the new managers, Monsieurs Firmin and André, the great stage. As the prima donna, Carlotta, is singing, a backdrop falls to the floor, nearly killing her. The cry is raised, "It's The Phantom of the Opera!" Upset, Carlotta refuses to sing.

Meg Giry, daughter of the ballet mistress, Madame Giry, suggests her friend, Christine Daaé, take Carlotta's place. Christine has been taking lessons from a mysterious new teacher.

At her triumph in the Opera, is Raoul, a nobleman and patron of the Opera. Raoul recognizes Christine as a childhood friend. He comes backstage after the performance to escort her to dinner, but Christine tells him she cannot go, because her teacher, "The Angel of Music," is very strict.

When Raoul leaves Christine's room, the Phantom appears. Christine is lured into the bowels of the Opera House, where the Phantom will continue her lessons.

He leads her to his underground lair, where she sees a frightening vision of herself in a wedding gown. She faints, only to be awakened several hours later by the Phantom's music on the organ. Creeping up behind him, she rips off his mask. Horrified, he takes her back to the surface.

The Phantom has sent notes to both the managers of the Opera, as well as Raoul, Madame Giry and Carlotta, which give instructions that Christine will have the lead in the new opera, Il Muto. The manager's refuse to give in to the Phantom's demands.

Il Muto proceeds as planned, with Carlotta in the lead, and Christine in a secondary role. As promised, disaster strikes - the stage hand, Joseph Buquet, is killed, and Carlotta's voice is stolen.

In the confusion, Raoul and Christine escape to the roof of the Opera House. There, with all of Paris around them, they pledge their love to one another. They cannot see the Phantom overhearing their vows of love. Enraged at Christine's betrayal, the Phantom causes the final disaster of the night - the mighty chandelier comes crashing to the stage floor.

Act 2:

The second act opens at a grand Masquerade Ball, held on the steps of the Paris Opera. No one has heard from the Phantom in six months. Christine and Raoul are engaged, but are keeping it a secret; Christine keeps her engagement ring on a chain around her neck.

Suddenly, the Phantom appears, disguised as The Red Death, and delivers to the managers a score from his opera, Don Juan Triumphant.

At first, the managers refuse to perform the strange, disturbing opera. Then, with the help of Raoul, they devise a plan to trap the Phantom, using Christine as bait. Plans for Don Juan Triumphant, and the trap, are made.

Christine visits the grave of her father. There on the grave stands the Phantom, beckoning her to join him. Raoul appears and takes her away.

At last, the opening night of Don Juan Triumphant arrives. The theater is surrounded by guards and police, eager to catch the Phantom. As the opera comes to its end, the Phantom takes the place of Piangi, the lead singer. He confronts Christine on stage during the performance, and escapes with her once more to his labyrinth below the Opera House.

In a last confrontation, the Phantom gives Christine a choice: stay with him forever, or he will kill Raoul. Her decision brings to an end the story of The Phantom of the Opera.
OMG that play was so good
by Juliet January 26, 2005
 
3.
a sequel to the Final Fantasy VII game, movie style. destined to be a kick arse movie just by seeing trailers.
Final Fantasy VII: Advent Children is gonna be a sweet movie! I'm already geeking out about it!! WOOT!
by Juliet December 19, 2004
 
4.
Acronym for "Eating Disorder Not Otherwise Specified." The DSM-IV categorizes any eating disorder without a name as "not otherwise specified." Often, people categorized as having ED-NOS basically have anorexia or bulimia but cannot be classified as such because of a technicality.
Some examples of people who are ED-NOS:
-A person who severely restricts food intake but is not yet underweight by DSM-IV standards
-A female who meets all other criteria for anorexia but continues to have regular menstrual periods.
-A person who regularly binges WITHOUT engaging in inappropriate compensatory behaviors such as purging (also known as binge eating disorder).
-Someone who binges and purges but does not meet the frequency or duration requirements for a diagnosis of bulimia
-Someone who regularly purges after eating regular amounts of food, but is not yet "clinically underweight."
-Someone who regularly chews food and spits it out without swallowing, but does not meet the criteria for either bulimia or anorexia.
-Any individual who is recovering from or just about to enter one of the "specified" eating disorders.
by Juliet January 24, 2005
 
5.
Orthorexia is an eating disorder similar to anorexia, though instead of an obsessive desire to lose weight, those who suffer from orthorexia have an unhealthy obsession with healthy eating. The word comes from Greek orthos, “correct or right”, plus orexis, “appetite”. In their search for dietary purity, orthorexics may become so restrictive about what they eat (for example, avoiding fatty foods, those containing preservatives, those with salt or sugar) that eventually they become as dangerously thin as an anorexic.
A woman who grew up with orthorexic parents said in an article that her parents removed as much sugar as possible from their family's diet and progressed into herbal remedies, then a vegan diet, and every extreme trend that came along in the '80s. Healthy eating had gone out of control. "I can remember always being hungry because there was no fat in the house. ... My middle sister ended up with anorexia. Another sister goes to Overeater's Anonymous."
by Juliet January 24, 2005
 
6.
to do your thang
"Meech said I can do my thug dizzle until he get out."
by Juliet December 06, 2003
 
7.
a great movie i.m.o. there was just something about it that stuck in my head after i left. i think it was worth the money i paid for a ticket. russell crowe is a great actor in this movie and in Gladiator.
"did you see the movie with the insanely long title Master and Commander the Far Side of the World?"
"yes i did. 'tis an awesome movie."
by Juliet April 15, 2004