7 definitions by Jrskow

Top Definition
n.

1. A preview, especially of something not yet public; an opportunity to see select portions before it is officially available.

Not to be confused with Sneak preview
I Just saw the sneak peek on Youtube.
by Jrskow July 15, 2011
transitive verb

1. A process that extracts text, signs or meaning from its original context (decontextualization) in order to introduce it into another context. Since the meaning of texts and signs depend on their context, recontextualization implies a change of meaning, and often of the communicative purpose too. Recontextualization at three different levels: 1) Intratextual 2) Intertextual 3) Interdiscursive.

2. The dynamic transfer-and-transformation of something from one discourse/text-in-context...to another.
“There is extreme power in the arrangement of images, and postmodern art uses recontextualization as a tool all the time to construct new meanings.”

“Found Magazine,” created by Davy Rothbart and Jason Bitner and based in Ann Arbor, Michigan and New York City, collects and catalogs found notes, photos, and other interesting items, publishing them in an irregularly-issued magazine, in books, and on its website. Their entire publication is based on the process of recontextualization.
by Jrskow July 16, 2011
n.

1. (Communication Arts / Broadcasting) a screening of a film, or series pilot, at an unexpected time to test audience reaction before its release. Not to be confused with sneak peek.
We were invited to a sneak preview at Warner Bros. Studios!
by Jrskow July 15, 2011
n.

In aspiring to open the imagination upon reality, Surrealism blurs the distinction between fact and fiction. In Surrealist documentaries the realistic effect is used to hook the viewer into the world represented by the film in order to disrupt taken-for-granted assumptions about that world. In Surrealist documentary, commentary is either absent, sparse or stripped of its dominance, becoming more of a dissonant or contrapuntal voice.
Examples of Surrealist Documentary:
- “Häxan” (English title: The Witches or Witchcraft Through The Ages) is a 1922 Swedish/Danish silent film written and directed by Benjamin Christensen. Based partly on Christensen's study of the Malleus Maleficarum, a 15th century German guide for inquisitors, Häxan is a study of how superstition and the misunderstanding of diseases and mental illness could lead to the hysteria of the witch-hunts.
- “Las Hurdes: Tierra Sin Pan” (1933), (English language: Land Without Bread or Unpromised Land) is a 27-minute-long documentary film directed by Luis Buñuel and co-produced by Buñuel and Ramon Acin. The narration was written by Buñuel, Rafael Sanchez Ventura, and Pierre Unik, with cinematography by Eli Lotar. The film focuses on the Las Hurdes region of Spain, the mountainous area around the town La Alberca, and the intense poverty of its occupants. Buñuel, who made the film after reading the ethnographic study Las Jurdes: étude de géographie humaine (1927) by Maurice Legendre, took a Surrealist approach to the notion of the anthropological expedition. The result was a travelogue in which the narrator’s extreme (indeed, exaggerated) descriptions of human misery of Las Hurdes contrasts with his flat and uninterested manner.
- “F for Fake” (1974), an Orson Welles film documenting/embellishing/fabricating information about "fakery" in general and about the famous "fakers" Elmyr de Hory and Clifford Irving.
by Jrskow July 16, 2011
n.

1. Sarcastically highlights moments in film or television that viewers find trite; inferring the moment is cliché, and could’ve been used in the trailer, preview, or sneak peek, as a means of generating hype. When used, the term embodies a condemnation of Hollywood cinema, the failure to innovate, and a reliance on cinematic clichés as a means attracting, and maintaining the appeal of a broader audience. Examples are often defined as corny; and identified in scenes described with intense action, powerful emotion, witty one-liners, or general “awe”.

Not to be confused with Trailer moment; Trailer déjà vu refers to instances not actually found in the theatrical trailer, preview, or sneak peek.
That scene just gave me a wicked case of trailer déjà vu; it was so corny, I can’t believe they didn’t use it in the trailer.
by Jrskow July 16, 2011
n.

1. A term used to sarcastically highlight widely recognizable moments in film or television, initially disclosed through trailers, previews, and sneak peeks; which intergrade a cliché context, adhering to stereotypes surrounding genre and target audience. When used, the term embodies a condemnation of Hollywood cinema, the failure to innovate, and a reliance on cinematic clichés as a means attracting, and maintaining the appeal of a broader audience. Examples are often defined as corny; and identified in scenes described with intense action, powerful emotion, witty one-liners, or general “awe”.

Not to be confused with Trailer déjà vu; trailer moments refer to instances actually used in the theatrical trailer, preview, or sneak peek.
The 1997 blockbuster, Titanic.
(Leonardo DiCaprio stands on the railing of the ship's bow, stretches out his arms and yells, "I am king of the world".)

At this time, the viewer would proclaim, “trailer moment!!!”
by Jrskow July 15, 2011
n.

1. A short trailer used to advertise an upcoming film, television program, video game or similar, usually released long in advance of the product, so as to "tease" the audience. Unlike typical theatrical trailers, they’re usually very short in length (between 30–60 seconds) and usually contain little, if any, actual footage from the film.

Teaser trailers are often made while the film is still in production or being edited and as a result they may feature scenes or alternate versions of scenes that are not in the finished film. Other ones (notably Pixar films) have scenes made for use in the trailer only, while sometimes, it is merely a truncated version of a theatrical trailer. Their purpose is less to tell the audience about a movie's content than simply to let them know that the movie is coming up in the near future, and to add to the hype of the upcoming release. Teaser trailers today are increasingly focused on internet downloading and the convention circuit.

See also, Teaser campaign.
Cloverfield, the Lord of the Rings trilogy, the newer Star Wars films, and The Ring, are all examples of major motion picture events that used teaser trailers to gain hype.
by Jrskow July 15, 2011
Free Daily Email

Type your email address below to get our free Urban Word of the Day every morning!

Emails are sent from daily@urbandictionary.com. We'll never spam you.

×