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2 definitions by C.G. Newton

 
1.
A poetic device used to draw comparison, or illustrate a parallel relationship between two different subjects. More or less the same as a simile, except omitting the word "like;" as in the following example- METAPHOR- Life is a box of chocolates./SIMILE- Life is like a box of chocolates. Confusion over these two techniques has resulted in untold disasters throughout the history of language.
The guy in the cowboy hat said, "Life is a metaphor for itself," but he's bi-polar and thinks he's Jesus, so don't pay no attention to him.
by C.G. Newton September 20, 2005
 
2.
1. (1564-1616) English poet, playwright, actor and director; not much is known about his life. He wrote 37 plays and over 200 poems, and is rumored to have contributed heavily to the translation of the King James' Bible. One of the most influential figures of the Renaissance era, his mastery of the English language, his keen understanding of human behavior, and his passionate dedication to the value of love and knowledge have ensured his survival, as a cross-cultural icon, for nearly 500 years, and at the dawn of a new century, the continuing popularity of his work seems to guarantee that his genius will continue to stretch far into the future; perhaps this continuing popularity is due to the fact that, though seen by many unenlightened eyes as old-fashioned, his works are filled with an insight and compassion for humanity, that were centuries ahead of their time.
Some of his plays include HAMLET, MACBETH, ROMEO AND JULIET, OTHELLO and A MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S DREAM. There are rumors of a 38th play, but although several "re-discovered" manuscripts have been put forward as possible contenders, no case has been adequately proven for any of them, to date.
2. A guy who has charm, wit and a way with words; a jack-of-all-trades, a loyal friend, a trustworthy confidant, and a passionate lover. In short, a Renaissance man.
That Shakespeare was dead sexy- he was a lover of all humanity, and he really knew how to use his tongue.
by C.G. Newton September 20, 2005