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9 definitions by BoostCreep

 
1.
Generally, an act of two vehicles, maybe more, engaging in an illegal contest of speed on various public thoroughfares. Historically, street racing in America got it's start in the 1960's when the three main American car companies were producing high powered rear-wheel-drivecars called muscle cars (example's include the Chevrolet Camaro, Plymouth Barracuda, and the Ford Mustang as well as many others). A private racing venue was not always available, and therefore the race would be held illegally on public roads, typically uncrowded highways on city outskirts or in the countryside, though some races were held in industrial complexes. One popular venue was Woodward Avenue in Detroit. Movies like "American Graffiti" and "Two Lane Blacktop" illustrated this culture and gained a cult following in the process.

Fast forward to the mid to late 80's where young men based in southern California began modifying small compact 4 cylinder engine import cars, specifically the Honda Civic, and racing them on the street. While there were still many muscle cars in existence, they were rare, and typically were not commonly raced on the street. This vacancy led to the uprising of the "boy-racer"; young men sporting modified imports (usually Japanese) with turbochargers, nitrous oxide, engine modifications, and wild bodykits consisting of aftermarket bumpers, side skirts and wings, with styling considered very radical for the time. This "boy-racer" or "ricer" image quickly caught on and spread, ushering in a new breed of street racer and street racing machine. The culture gained a huge following and garnered much attention in the media, with a number of automotive magazines dedicating themselves to this specific culture. Some of this new breed of racer was more daring, more dangerous than their predecesors, challenging races in traffic and on busy highways, though many races were similarly held like their predecesors, in abandoned industrial parks and highways at night. Popularity soared with the availability of cheap sport compact cars that took very easily to speed modifications, and venues and races grew in size, leading to more media popularity as well as news reports concerning this "new" culture. Movies such as "The Fast and the Furious" and video games such as "Need For Speed: Underground" were inspired by this culture. Eventually, people in this style of culture were refered to as "tuners".

In early 2000's, rivalry between those who preferred the older muscle cars and tuners began to take shape. Many races were "import versus domestic" (though many tuner cars are actually considered domestic). There was much smack talk between the two sides.

Today street racing is still very popular in a number of locations across the nation, though rivalry between makes seems to have waned. Today's street racer is usually associated with a team, or a crew, and is generally very organized thanks to today's wireless communication abilities. Ages can range from as young as barely licensed on up past 60+, though the average age is 27. While many kinds vehicles are involved in the culture, Three generalizations are usually realized; the long standing muscle car and tuner car, as well as luxury or "exotic" cars (such as the Audi S4) which is also gaining popularity.

NOTE: Street racing should not be confused with road racing, which is a legally sanctioned race event that takes place on closed off public roads.
I just saw an Audi S4, Mitsubishi 3000GT VR-4, and a Ford Mustang Cobra street racing in the industrial complex.
by BoostCreep May 14, 2009
66 24
 
2.
Generally, an act of two vehicles, maybe more, engaging in an illegal contest of speed on various public thoroughfares. Historically, street racing in America got it's start in the 1960's when the three main American car companies were producing high powered rear-wheel-drivecars called muscle cars (example's include the Chevrolet Camaro, Plymouth Barracuda, and the Ford Mustang as well as many others). A private racing venue was not always available, and therefore the race would be held illegally on public roads, typically uncrowded highways on city outskirts or in the countryside, though some races were held in industrial complexes. One popular venue was Woodward Avenue in Detroit. Movies like "American Graffiti" and "Two Lane Blacktop" illustrated this culture and gained a cult following in the process.

Fast forward to the mid to late 80's where young men based in southern California began modifying small compact 4 cylinder engine import cars, specifically the Honda Civic, and racing them on the street. While there were still many muscle cars in existence, they were rare, and typically were not commonly raced on the street. This vacancy led to the uprising of the "boy-racer"; young men sporting modified imports (usually Japanese) with turbochargers, nitrous oxide, engine modifications, and wild bodykits consisting of aftermarket bumpers, side skirts and wings, with styling considered very radical for the time. This "boy-racer" or "ricer" image quickly caught on and spread, ushering in a new breed of street racer and street racing machine. The culture gained a huge following and garnered much attention in the media, with a number of automotive magazines dedicating themselves to this specific culture. Some of this new breed of racer was more daring, more dangerous than their predecesors, challenging races in traffic and on busy highways, though many races were similarly held like their predecesors, in abandoned industrial parks and highways at night. Popularity soared with the availability of cheap sport compact cars that took very easily to speed modifications, and venues and races grew in size, leading to more media popularity as well as news reports concerning this "new" culture. Movies such as "The Fast and the Furious" and video games such as "Need For Speed: Underground" were inspired by this culture. Eventually, people in this style of culture were refered to as "tuners".

In early 2000's, rivalry between those who preferred the older muscle cars and tuners began to take shape. Many races were "import versus domestic" (though many tuner cars are actually considered domestic). There was much smack talk between the two sides.

Today street racing is still very popular in a number of locations across the nation, though rivalry between makes seems to have waned. Today's street racer is usually associated with a team, or a crew, and is generally very organized thanks to today's wireless communication abilities. Ages can range from as young as barely licensed on up past 60+, though the average age is 27. While many kinds vehicles are involved in the culture, Three generalizations are usually realized; the long standing muscle car and tuner car, as well as luxury or "exotic" cars (such as the Audi S4) which is also gaining popularity.

NOTE: Street racing should not be confused with road racing, which is a legally sanctioned race event that takes place on closed off public roads.
I just saw a Pontiac Trans Am, Mistubishi Eclipse GSX, and a BMW M3 street race down the highway.
by BoostCreep May 12, 2009
31 9
 
3.
TSi
A series designation used on Chrysler vehicles to denote a special sporting nature. The acronym, according to sources within Chrysler Corp itself, stands for Touring Sport injection. Vehicles with this factory designation were considered to be Chrysler company's most sporting of any particular model. TSi models released in America included the Chrysler Conquest, Eagle Talon, Jeep Grand Cherokee, Eagle Vision, and most recently the Chrysler Sebring TSi.

Some claim that the "T" character in the acronym stands for "Turbo" or "Turbocharged". While Chrysler does not deny or confirm this, it should be noted that out of all the TSi models released, only two were actually fitted with factory turbochargers, those being the Conquest and the Talon. While the character "i" in this series does stand for "injection", it should be noted that all these vehicles were fuel injected, and the "i" character indicates an increased performance value through some form of additional engine tuning, be it electronic, forced induction, or larger displacement.
The Eagle Talon TSi was offered in both front and all wheel drive.
by BoostCreep May 29, 2009
9 1
 
4.
In the automotive world, is short for nitrous oxide, a chemical compound used to increase vehicle engine performance. Also referred to as nos or noss in certain circles, though overall this reference is looked down upon.
I installed nitrous on my car
by BoostCreep May 14, 2009
13 6
 
5.
Term used to denote a type of street race that occurs specifically on a long stretch of highway. Generally, this type of race is impromptu, or spur of the moment, and is challenged while moving on the highway. Racers may or may not know one another.

Typically, while driving down the highway, driver 1 pulls in to a left or right position (when highway structure permits)behind the individual he wishes to challenge. Driver 1 then flashes his high beam headlights a number of times to officially challenge driver 2. Driver 2 would accept the challenge by turning on his flashers or hazard lights, or decline the race by applying his brakes, thus activating his vehicle's brake lights and indicating to driver 1 that they decline the challenge.

If the challenge is accepted, driver 1 pulls along side driver 2. A few moments are spent prepping for the race by getting at the proper speed, which is usually determined by driver 2. Driver 1 then holds up a number of fingers to indicate which horn blast the race will begin on (typically 3). Driver 2 would nod in agreement, and driver 1 would then honk his horn the agreed amount (here it's 3). Immediately on the third horn blast both participants mash the throttle and begin the race. The race is determined in a number of ways, though normally it ends when the lead car has held a stong lead of at least 5 car links ahead of his opponent for about 10 to 15 seconds, the lead car pulls ahead and out of view of his opponent, or the trailing car quits. In this race, the lead driver CAN quit and end the race, and such would NOT be considered a loss.

Obviously certain conditions must be observed during these battles. From traffic flow, to weather, to course and surroundings, all things must be considered. Speeds commonly get very high and dangerous, though most races are held honorably, with each driver knowing when to quit.

Historically, these races were popularized in Japan in the late 80's with the advent of the modern Japanese supercars such as the Toyota Supra or Nissan Skyline. They are currently very common around Tokyo's super highways such as the Wangan or the Shinanobashi, whose traffic flow late at night and construction make for excellent venue. This kind of racing is gaining popularity in America, specfically late at night on multilane country highways and interstates.

This kind of racing is the primary backdrop in the video game "Tokyo Xtreme Racer 3"
I was on my way home from work when I saw a highway battle between a Plymouth Laser and an early model Nissan 300ZX.
by BoostCreep May 14, 2009
8 1
 
6.
1. Term originating in the mid 90's to describe young men (between the ages of 13-20) who were into the import racing scene and drove stylized import cars.

2. A type of automotive styling noted by huge bumpers and side skirts on a car, usually accompanied by a large mould formed solid piece spoiler or wing mounted on the trunk.
Jose is into that boy racer crap.

That car is your typical boy racer styling.
by BoostCreep May 17, 2009
6 3
 
7.
Automotive slang for the use of nitrous oxide as an automotive engine performance enhancer and is usually described in terms of specific power increase to the engine (i.e. 50 additional horsepower from a noss set up would be called a 50-shot of noss). Actual slang is spelled either "noss" or nos and was first popularized by it's use in the film "The Fast and The Furious", where lead character Paul Walker says "I need nos!!" in reference to his car's need for a nitrous oxide performance enhancement.

The term was originally a play off of the name of the company "Nitrous Oxide Systems", whose logo is basically the capital letters N-O-S.

It's use is mainly limited to the import or sport compact side of the automotive performance scene, though in many cirlces the use of this slang is actually looked down upon (where the prefered term is nitrous ).
Dude, my Civic has a 50-shot of noss.
by BoostCreep May 14, 2009
3 1