192 definitions by Abu Yahya

(FINANCE) Used either as a noun: a situation in which a trader controls the supply of a traded item, such as shares of stock, supplies of a commodity, etc.

Or else, used as a verb: to obtain control over the supply of a thing, so that one can drive the price up to extremely high levels.

Cornering the market for anything (or getting a corner) is extremely difficult and requires not only immense amounts of money (usually borrowed for the purpose), but also timing and the ability to bluff opponents.

A corner is ultimately a long position in the sense that it is a direct attack on investors taking a short position.
The corner must be timed very precisely, because it cannot last for more than a very short time. Even when the the price of the thing (like, say, silver) goes up to very, very high levels, more supplies cannot come onto the market or the corner will be lost.

At the same time, there has to be a target of the corner--some group of people who have to buy the cornered item no matter how high the price goes (otherwise, the quantity demanded will just go to zero). For this reason, corners are nearly always part of an attempt to squeeze the shorts.
by Abu Yahya April 05, 2010
(FINANCE) hilarious term used for over a century in the trading of stocks, commodities, etc. A way in which someone who controls much of the outstanding shares of stock can make a lot of money while ruining those who are betting against the stock.

A "short" is traditionally someone with expertise in shorting a stock, i.e., managing to borrow shares and sell them in anticipation of a decline in value. Obviously, if there are many people shorting a particular stock at any given time, and if they are wrong about the future, then a steep rise in value if the share price will not only cause them to lose money, it will force panic purchases of stock as the traders attempt to cover their shorts. If the instigator of the squeeze is successful, he will have a corner, and drive the price of the stock up to absurd levels.

An unsuccessful squeeze of shorts in a copper trust triggered the Crisis of 1907. That, in turn, triggered the Aldrich–Vreeland Act (May 1908).
The brokers, after awhile, commenced to borrow large amounts of the stock. This convinced the insiders that there was a big short interest somewhere, and they got together in order to squeeze the shorts... They never awakened to the fact that the {president of the company} had sold out on them... {and were totally ruined}

Henry Clews, Victor Niederhoffer, *Fifty Years in Wall Street*, p.149
by Abu Yahya April 05, 2010
(FINANCE) a financial instrument whose value is tied to something else; for example,

* a futures contract (future)

* an option

* a swap

In each of these examples, the value of the derivative is related in some way to the price of something else. When the market price of (say) an ounce of gold goes from $1000/oz to $1050/oz, the return to the owner of 1 oz. of actual gold is 5%. But for the owner of a call option or a future, the return is much, much greater than that.

A derivative can be used to multiply risk AND potential profits to speculators; but it can be used for the counterparty to minimize risk by locking in prices, or by hedging against risk.
The economic crisis of 2008 has really focused attention on the financial derivative market.
by Abu Yahya April 05, 2010
the gap between revenues and expenditures for a government (over a given period of time); often referred to as an internal deficit or public deficit.
The public deficit accumulates over each time period (usually a year) into what is known as the public debt.

According to Keynesian and Neo-Keynesian economic theory, fiscal deficits are usually the most effective tool for stimulating economic activity; the actual choice of how the money is spent is less important.
In the USA, most states are not allowed to run fiscal deficits. In other federal republics, such as India and Argentina, they are allowed and frequently account for much of those countries' internal deficits.
by Abu Yahya February 14, 2009
(FINANCE) a situation in which an investor owns financial instruments (shares, bonds, financial derivatives, etc.) that will make the most money IF some other thing declines in value.

Therefore, one always has to take a short position on something in particular. A short position on gold means the investor expects gold to decline in value in the near future, and has bought various things to make money if it does.

Some ways to take a short position on X include:

(1) buying a put option on X

(2) writing a call option on X

(3) borrowing X and selling it (shorting a stock)

#3 is the classical way to take a short position. It was dangerous because a skillful trader could squeeze the shorts using a corner.
BILL: I guess you took a bath when the stock market tanked, huh?

ANA: Nope. I took a short position on all of the nine largest banks. Did rather well, thank you very much.

BIL: Sweet!
by Abu Yahya April 05, 2010
AEI
(acronym) American Enterprise Institute; an extremely powerful thinktank associated with the Conservative Movement.
The AEI is extremely well-connected, and much favored by business interests.
by Abu Yahya May 29, 2009
*noun*; a concept central to the idea of Keynesian economics. Under this theory, business cycles (recessions, depressions, booms, recoveries) are caused by a failure of total demand across the entire economy to match total output.

Aggregate demand is not merely influenced by people's ability to buy what they produce; it is also influenced by the marginal propensity to consume (MPC). If the MPC is less than 1, then an increase in national income will be matched by a smaller increase in aggregate demand, causing unemployment to rise and prices to fall.
...When we say that the expectation of an increased demand, i.e. a raising of the aggregate demand function, will lead to an increase in aggregate output, we really mean that the firms, which own the capital equipment, will be induced to associate with it a greater aggregate employment of labour

J.M. Keynes, *The General Theory of Employment, Interest, and Money* (1936), Ch.4
by Abu Yahya March 03, 2009

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